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NEWS STORIES

You may soon be allowed to keep Submitted: 07/22/2013
Story By Lyndsey Stemm


RHINELANDER - You may already grow your own vegetables, but people in Rhinelander could soon also raise their own chickens. The city's Protection of Persons and Property Committee met today to consider just that.

The committee heard a proposal to allow backyard chickens within the city limits. If they approve, the full city council will vote on weather to adopt the ordinance.

Rhinelander resident Jen VanOrder made the proposal. She also submitted examples of regulations that other cities use.

"It's pretty basic, common sense stuff. They have to have an adequate shelter; it has to be kept sanitary and clean. Obviously the rule is no roosters; you don't need roosters to have egg production. You are only allowed four hens and you have to get a license from the city," says VanOrder.

Fire Chief Terry Williams will work with VanOrder to fine-tune the regulations they'll propose to the city. They'll bring it back up with the PPP committee next month, and then the full council can vote.

Sue Schneider lives just outside of Rhinelander in Pine Lake. She's been raising chickens for years.

She understands concerns people might have about their neighbors keeping chickens, but says hers have never had a problem.

"They're easy to keep clean; shovel out their cook, you know, once a month and that keeps down any odor or anything like that. As far as taking care of them, that is always a possibility. They need to be watered and fed every day. But like I said, it only takes five minutes," says Schneider.

We asked our Facebook friends what they thought. There were a few people who were not crazy about the idea. They worried about cleanliness and people not taking proper care of the chickens. But most people said if their neighbors followed the rules they wouldn't mind. Some even said they thought it was a good idea.



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