Organization helps kids dealing with cancerSubmitted: 07/14/2013
Story By Lauren Stephenson

EAGLE RIVER - "It's the families that have to deal with the cancer. It affects the whole family, a lot more than people really realize," says Richard Lemke, Camp Angel's coordinator.

He knows the impact cancer has on a family: he lost his wife to cancer.

Lemke volunteers for Angel on My Shoulder, a non-profit Lolly Rose founded.

She started it in 1995 in memory of her husband who died of cancer.

The foundation runs free camps for kids between the ages of 8 and 18.

"They're weekend retreats. They're support camps for kids living with people that have cancer, or they've lost a loved one to cancer. That would be a parent, grandparent, or sibling," says Rose.

Lemke's three sons went to the camp.

Like many campers, they came back as counselors.
The camps have continued through the generosity of volunteers, like the Strauss family.
They own Pirates Hideaway in Eagle River.

It provides family-friendly pirate tours on the Eagle River Chain of Lakes.

After 5 years, it has become a staple in the Camp Angel experience.

"We go out for 45-minutes. We enjoy popcorn and lemonade with the kids. We take a ride. We see the eagles. It's a different perspective out on the water versus your normal camp atmosphere. We do tattoos with the kids, we decorate t-shirts, and they just have a blast," says Pirates Hideaway owner Steve Strauss.

Activities like riding on the pirate ship gives Camp Angel kids the opportunity to be kids again.

"It gives the kids an opportunity to get away from the cancer and enjoy the whole weekend and not have to deal with it," adds Lemke.

So what are some of the campers' favorite memories from this weekend?

"I've met some really great people. They've become my friends," says camper Moria Sheehan.

"Probably just going around. Sailing on a pirate ship. How often do you get to do that?" says camper Tyler Foydik.

The campers may only be kids, but their strength and grace throughout these difficult times inspires.
"If anybody else is going through problems with people who have cancer, I highly recommend this camp," Foydik adds.

"I just want to say to all those who have cancer, good luck," says Alissondra Quatsoe.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com

What We're Working OnSubmitted: 10/08/2015

- Thousands of books, magazines and videos will move across Eagle River this week to a temporary home.  It'll help make space for nearly $3 million in renovations to the Olson Memorial Library.  What makes the project so special?  We'll explain tonight at 5.

- Plus, live cutting events give logging manufacturers the chance to better connect with their customers. It also gives them the opportunity to show off some amazing machines. We made it to a live cutting event near Crandon Wednesday. Tonight on Newswatch 12 we'll discuss the industry and advancements.

We'll have the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

+ Read More

CRANDON - Live cutting events give logging manufacturers the chance to better connect with their customers. It also gives them the opportunity to show off some amazing machines. Nortrax held a live cut event Wednesday near Crandon.

It showcased its modern tools for the logging industry. Longtime workers like Nortrax U.S. Cut to Length Manager Ken Knauf say the way wood gets cut is what really looks different these days.

+ Read More

THREE LAKES - Pumpkin Fest celebrates fall in the Three Lakes. This year, a new event will emphasize the creative side.

+ Read More

CASSIAN - Veterans who die in Wisconsin currently have no options for national cemetery options for burial in their home state.

A new national cemetery in Oneida County will soon change that.

+ Read More

EAGLE RIVER - Traffic will once again flow freely in downtown Eagle River.

This week, workers laid what's called the "binder coat" of pavement on Division Street.

+ Read More

WISCONSIN - Rural Northwoods schools face different challenges than others in the state.

Some of those include declining enrollment, high transportation costs, and broadband.

Wisconsin Association of School Boards' Executive Director John Ashley is in the Northwoods this week talking about some of those problems. 

Newswatch 12s Kaitlyn Howe spoke with him Thursday.

+ Read More

MADISON - Wisconsin will host a Democratic presidential primary debate on Feb. 11.

+ Read More
+ More General News

Click Here