Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Organization helps kids dealing with cancerSubmitted: 07/14/2013
Story By Lauren Stephenson


EAGLE RIVER - "It's the families that have to deal with the cancer. It affects the whole family, a lot more than people really realize," says Richard Lemke, Camp Angel's coordinator.

He knows the impact cancer has on a family: he lost his wife to cancer.

Lemke volunteers for Angel on My Shoulder, a non-profit Lolly Rose founded.

She started it in 1995 in memory of her husband who died of cancer.

The foundation runs free camps for kids between the ages of 8 and 18.

"They're weekend retreats. They're support camps for kids living with people that have cancer, or they've lost a loved one to cancer. That would be a parent, grandparent, or sibling," says Rose.

Lemke's three sons went to the camp.

Like many campers, they came back as counselors.
The camps have continued through the generosity of volunteers, like the Strauss family.
They own Pirates Hideaway in Eagle River.

It provides family-friendly pirate tours on the Eagle River Chain of Lakes.

After 5 years, it has become a staple in the Camp Angel experience.

"We go out for 45-minutes. We enjoy popcorn and lemonade with the kids. We take a ride. We see the eagles. It's a different perspective out on the water versus your normal camp atmosphere. We do tattoos with the kids, we decorate t-shirts, and they just have a blast," says Pirates Hideaway owner Steve Strauss.

Activities like riding on the pirate ship gives Camp Angel kids the opportunity to be kids again.

"It gives the kids an opportunity to get away from the cancer and enjoy the whole weekend and not have to deal with it," adds Lemke.

So what are some of the campers' favorite memories from this weekend?

"I've met some really great people. They've become my friends," says camper Moria Sheehan.

"Probably just going around. Sailing on a pirate ship. How often do you get to do that?" says camper Tyler Foydik.

The campers may only be kids, but their strength and grace throughout these difficult times inspires.
"If anybody else is going through problems with people who have cancer, I highly recommend this camp," Foydik adds.

"I just want to say to all those who have cancer, good luck," says Alissondra Quatsoe.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

EAGLE RIVER - Vilas County's courthouse expansion could look a little different and sit in a different spot than previously agreed upon, but those changes could save close to a million dollars and speed up construction.  Tuesday, a county committee agreed that's a good path to take.

+ Read More

WISCONSIN - Coyotes become more active and territorial this time of year.

That's because it's breeding season for the animals.

The DNR hopes people will take steps to avoid interactions with coyotes.

+ Read More

TOMAHAWK - The Lincoln County Sheriff's Department blames snow conditions for causing a semi truck rollover Tuesday morning.

The accident happened on Highway 8 north of Tomahawk just after 6 a.m.

+ Read More

MADISON - The state Assembly has passed a bill ensuring that sexual assault victims and others who report such crimes can't be cited or disciplined for underage drinking.

+ Read More

MADISON - The state Assembly has approved a bill that would push the start of Wisconsin's wolf hunt back if the federal government allows the season to resume.

+ Read More

RHINELANDER - Nearly 150 lakes, rivers, and creeks in Oneida County contain some type of invasive species. That's why 12 counties in northern Wisconsin have come together to hold the Fifth Northwoods' Invasive Species Poster Contest.

+ Read More

MADISON - The state Senate has approved a bill that would give libraries more power to collect fines for overdue materials.

The measure would create exceptions to privacy laws protecting borrowers' identities so libraries could report them to collection agencies and police.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here