NEWS STORIES

Eagle River hosts 21st annual antique showSubmitted: 07/07/2013

Lauren Stephenson
5 p.m. Anchor/Reporter
lstephenson@wjfw.com


EAGLE RIVER - People could shop and learn at Northland Pines High School this weekend.

"Jewelry and glass, and pottery, postcards. You name it. There's just a little bit of something for everybody," says Steve Bina, manager of the Eagle River Antique Show.

Twenty-five vendors from six different states set up shop in Eagle River this weekend.

It was the 21st annual Eagle River Antique Show.

Dealers from as far as South Carolina came to town because they know they'll sell quite a bit of antiques.

"One of the things that people do on vacation is they like to go to antique shops and kind of mosey around, and so we just thought it was a natural place for us to have a show," Bina adds.

He expected 1,000 people to attend the two-day show.

"We've always sold well at this show. People up here have the knowledge and appreciation of good antiques," says Frances Rosenau, owner of Time's Treasure's Antiques.

But it's not just about business. Bina donates some of the admission profits to local organizations.

"Some of the money is going to go to the humane society, and then also a share will also go to St. Peter's youth group that are also doing our concessions here today," he says.

Many of the dealers are former teachers. They hope teenagers will become interested in antiques.

"I think it's a wonderful way for students and families to come to learn about beautiful things from different periods of time," says former teacher Clarann Stocker. She now owns Antiques on Spirit.

"Coming to an antique show is like coming to see a piece of the past. It's a history lesson as you walk around here," Bina adds.

He hoped free admission for kids 16 and under would pull them in.

At least 80 teenagers attended the educational experience on Saturday.

But people of all ages could learn a thing or two.

The dealers offered free seminars Sunday.

Frances Rosenau has one simple piece of advice for people who want to collect antiques: "If you're buying for investment, make sure what you're buying is good quality and you can live with it. Our rule about buying something is: if we never sell it, we can die with it and be happy."

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

LAONA - The state's Natural Resources Board plays a major role in shaping how Wisconsin interacts with the natural world.

It's filled that role since its creation in the 1920s.

Now, Gov. Scott Walker wants to strip the citizen board of much of its power as part of his state budget proposal.

+ Read More

WESLACO, TEXAS - Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker left a tour of the U.S.-Mexico border without addressing questions about his stance on immigration.

The likely Republican presidential contender remained invisible to reporters on Friday during a visit that could have given him a chance to spotlight his views regarding immigration policy and border security.

+ Read More

RHINELANDER - An ongoing drug investigation led to the arrest of five people in Rhinelander earlier this week.

Investigators believe 40-year-old Michael Steinmetz, Jr. and 38-year-old Jaime Rickert were making meth in their Rhinelander apartment.

According to the criminal complaint, Steinmetz admitted to investigators that he made meth and dumped the waste in the toilet in his apartment.

+ Read More

MERRILL - Census data show more people leaving many parts of northern Wisconsin. The population loss is a problem that continues to challenge rural parts of Wisconsin.

+ Read More

MADISON - The Wisconsin Supreme Court has canceled oral arguments it planned to hold next month on three cases related to the secret investigation into Gov. Scott Walker's 2012 recall campaign.

+ Read More

WAUSAU - A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests doctors struggle to accurately interpret breast biopsies.

+ Read More

MADISON - Wisconsin's attempt to ban same-sex marriages will cost taxpayers more than $1 million.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here