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Prosthetic Orthotic Center serves patients in Northwoods, Upper MichiganSubmitted: 07/05/2013
Story By Lex Gray

Prosthetic Orthotic Center serves patients in Northwoods, Upper Michigan
MINOCQUA - People who live in the Northwoods know it's easy to find natural beauty and peace and quiet.

But living in a remote area sometimes means having to travel far for things like medical services.

That's especially tough for people with physical disabilities.

Bob Lotz CPO, FAAOP hopes to make things a little easier on his patients.

He opened the Prosthetic Orthotic Center in Minocqua about three years ago.

Patients come to him from all over the Northwoods and Upper Michigan.

"My experience includes working at children's hospitals and the Mayo Clinic, and this is all I've ever done. I just really enjoy what I do," Lotz said. "I enjoy having patients coming through the door. At this point, it becomes a question of whether they can pay for it or not because of the new insurance environment out there."

That was the case for Tom Peterson of Ironwood. He lost his leg in a motorcycle accident last July.

"The convenience of it being close is amazing, especially during the winter months," Peterson said. "I had problems with Medicaid, saying I would have to wait about six months to get into a prosthetic, and Bob said I should have been walking a month ago when I first came in in a wheelchair, then walker. It's benefited me amazingly."

Lotz hopes to eventually be able to open his Minocqua office full-time.

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