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Learning life lessons from a horseSubmitted: 07/02/2013
Story By Shardaa Gray


Photos By Shardaa Gray

MCNAUGHTON - We can learn life lessons from parents, teachers and friends.

But have you ever thought you can learn from a horse?

There's no doubt McNaughton's Jonathan Brood loves horse.

He was raised on a sheep and cattle farm in Upper Michigan.

There, he learned how to work with his first horse.

"Once I got into horses, really everything we did with that horse on the farm was wrong," said Horsemanship Director, Jonathan Brood.

"As we really started growing in my understanding horsemanship, you just kind of go well, we lived it was good."

Now, Jonathan teaches at Fort Wilderness Camp in McNaughton.

Every Monday he teaches leadership with campers by building trust with horses.

"Horses look for leaders. They have to be a leader. It's either it's going to be a leader or you are and they want to know that right from the get go," Brood said.

"One of the things we'll talk about tonight is the fact that we as people look for leaders too."

We deal with fear almost every day.

Brood wants some of the kids to conquer their fear.

"You'll have kids that are totally afraid of being on the horses back and as they've done you can say, 'see look what you've accomplished; what you've done with that horse'" Brood said.

"That fear just totally melts away."

Battling an obstacle can be tough in life.

Brood teaches that to kids by setting obstacles for the horses to get around.

"They have to get this horse to do it, do something. Well the horse knows that's the hardest thing to do so it wants to make its way around, but in the process the child is growing in its confidence." said Brood.

Confidence learned on a farm can be used in all of life's aspects.


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