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Study say Americans don't love their cars as much as they used toSubmitted: 07/02/2013

Adam Fox
10 p.m. Anchor/Reporter
afox@wjfw.com


RHINELANDER - Most Americans love hot dogs, fireworks and beer on Independence Day.

But another American love affair could be changing.

A new study from the University of Michigan says Americans are becoming less attached to their cars.

The number of registered cars, trucks, vans and SUVs has gone down since the recession.

But Travis Trickey has sold cars for a decade.

He says business at Rhinelander Toyota is on the rise.

"People are still apprehensive from the big swing from 2007,2008 and 2009, Trickey said. "People are looking more now trying to fit into their budget obviouisly, but they are still looking for vehicles that have gadgets and gizmos."

One likely reason for that is the Northwoods lack of public transportation.

The Michigan study says young adults are most likely to shun vehicles.

But Rick Kenoedler thinks that's on the car manufacturers.

"I think a lot depends on what the car manufactuers are producing," Kenoedler said. "If its something exciting, people get excited about it and want them. If they are just boring transportation cars, whats there to be excited about."

The number of registered vehicles peaked at 236 million in 2008.

The Michigan researchers say that number is likely to rise again because of the improving economy.



Related Weblinks:
University of Michigan Study

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 IN OTHER NEWS

RHINELANDER - The City of Rhinelander and Oneida County will consider borrowing $15 million to help develop a manufacturer in Rhinelander, according to an Oneida County Economic Development Corporation release Tuesday.

The money would help Rhinelander Coated Products start work inside the former Printpack building on Kemp Street.

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BOULDER JUNCTION - Pilots find very little room for error when they make a landing.  Wings, flaps, and landing gear all need to work properly.  Then there's the runway itself, which needs to be flat and smooth.

So, when pilots found ruts and divots torn into the grass runway at Boulder Junction's airport, folks were more than upset, they were worried about safe landings.  Airfield president Jeff Long thinks someone used a pickup truck to do the damage.  It happened right before the airfield's busiest weekend of the year, the Musky Day fly-in.

"To see somebody disregard that, disrespect that, and then again the safety, where somebody could get hurt that we're inviting up here for summer fun, doesn't make you feel very good," Long said.

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What We're Working OnSubmitted: 08/23/2016

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:

Governor Scott Walker was at Nicolet College in Rhinelander today to talk about school funding. Find out what he has to say about preparing students for higher education.

We'll tell you why some kids from low-income families in Forest County won't have to start school without supplies.

And we'll introduce you to an amazing athlete with the Rhinelander Hodags swim team who is home-schooled and hopes her younger siblings will become great swimmers as well.

We'll bring you the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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THREE LAKES - Pollinators play an essential role in the growth of plants, and it's not just bees that help pollinate.

Butterflies, bats, and even mosquitoes are pollinators, but those populations have been in decline in recent years.

"Across the U.S., pollinators have been seeing big declines," said Oneida County Conservationist Michele Sadauskas. "We've been hearing more and more about our honeybee pollinations. The monarch populations have had dramatic decreases. So we're seeing it across the board."

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CRANDON - For some Northwoods families, it can be hard to find the money to pay for their kids' school supplies every year, but a back-to-school program in Forest County is giving children the supplies they need to succeed.

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MADISON - New state regulations designed to retain teachers are going into effect.

The package was published Tuesday. The provisions allow retired teachers or teachers nearing retirement to apply for a nonrenewable five-year license without submitting a professional development plan. They also increase the time that short-term substitute teachers can serve in the same assignment from 20 days to 45 days.

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EAGLE RIVER - Cities across the Northwoods drop tens of thousands of dollars every winter on crack sealing roads.  The Eagle River Airport is no different.  The airport spent about $25,000 in 2016 patching up its main runway.

Arguably, that runway is even older than most roads people drive on.  The runway was last redone in 1971.  On a busy day, the 5,000-foot runway hosts upwards of 80 takeoffs and landings.  Airport manager Rob Hom showed Newswatch 12 a number of places where the pavement is buckling and cracked.  That can lead to dangerous landings for small planes.

"Relative to a car or a truck [a prop-powered airplane is] pretty light relatively speaking, so having a smooth runway is imperative," Hom said.

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