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Study say Americans don't love their cars as much as they used toSubmitted: 07/02/2013

Adam Fox
10 p.m. Anchor/Reporter
afox@wjfw.com


RHINELANDER - Most Americans love hot dogs, fireworks and beer on Independence Day.

But another American love affair could be changing.

A new study from the University of Michigan says Americans are becoming less attached to their cars.

The number of registered cars, trucks, vans and SUVs has gone down since the recession.

But Travis Trickey has sold cars for a decade.

He says business at Rhinelander Toyota is on the rise.

"People are still apprehensive from the big swing from 2007,2008 and 2009, Trickey said. "People are looking more now trying to fit into their budget obviouisly, but they are still looking for vehicles that have gadgets and gizmos."

One likely reason for that is the Northwoods lack of public transportation.

The Michigan study says young adults are most likely to shun vehicles.

But Rick Kenoedler thinks that's on the car manufacturers.

"I think a lot depends on what the car manufactuers are producing," Kenoedler said. "If its something exciting, people get excited about it and want them. If they are just boring transportation cars, whats there to be excited about."

The number of registered vehicles peaked at 236 million in 2008.

The Michigan researchers say that number is likely to rise again because of the improving economy.



Related Weblinks:
University of Michigan Study

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