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NEWS STORIES

Summer driving safetySubmitted: 06/13/2013
Story By Melissa Constanzer

ACROSS THE NORTHWOODS - We often think of wintertime driving being the toughest. Snowy and icy roads can create more than just headaches for drivers but summertime driving produces plenty of hazards, too. From downpours to dense fog and sunglare, summertime driving isn't easy.

"In the summertime, the rain can cause hydroplaning, which can be a slipper surface on the road where you lose traction. Cars have been known to drift right off the road while hydroplaning over a puddle," says Mike Steffes, Rhinelander Police Chief.

Police Chief Steffes suggests checking your windshield wipers, tire pressure, and tire tread for a safe trip. But even when we turn the car off, there are still transportation risks. Be sure to close the windows and lock your doors, even if there's no rain coming.

"We have people that go around and just check to see if the car doors are open, and if they are, they'll take out any pocket change, CD's, computers, anything else that was left in the vehicle," says Police Chief Steffes.

If you have any pets in the car, leave the windows cracked open. Animals overheat quickly on warm or sunny days. Also watch out for more children playing in the streets with school out for summer.



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