Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Knowing the Symptoms Helps Prevent Lyme DiseaseSubmitted: 05/23/2013
Story By Melissa Constanzer

Knowing the Symptoms Helps Prevent Lyme Disease
MINOCQUA - "This disease is called the great imitator for a good reason," says Jeff Waite.

Lyme disease can be good at hiding.

"Lyme disease is a bacterial type infection spread by a spiral keet, which is also considered a parasite. And it can be carried in the spit glands and intestinal track of ticks in this area. Particularly the deer tick," said Dr. Kurt Landauer.

Lyme disease can be a debilitating disease if left untreated. Northwoods father, Jeff Waite, knows that well. His daughter, Jennifer, got Lyme disease in 2003. Test results came back negative so she went untreated for years.

"The bacteria had had its way with her body for two and a half years and ended up getting into her brain and doing damage to her nervous system," said Jeff Waite.

Jennifer still battles with the disease.

So what's the best way to avoid going through what Jennifer went through? ... Staying informed.

"Knowing what the symptoms are is a must up here in the Northwoods. Because, you know, a lot of times you'll get bit by a tick and you won't even know it," says Jeff Waite.

Ticks that carry the disease are as small as a poppy seed. Checking your body for ticks is a good idea after walking in the woods. But you don't always catch every one. Watching for symptoms is often your only sign of Lyme disease.

"Symptoms to watch for are like a bad summer flu. Headaches, fevers, muscle aches and during the ticks season, I consider that Lyme disease unless I have something else to blame it on," says Dr. Landauer.

But not every tick carries Lyme disease. Most ticks need to be drawing your blood for 24 hours before the bacteria can be transferred. However, Wisconsin is still among the top ranking states for the disease. Northern Wisconsin is no exception.

"It's definitely a problem up here. We see a lot of Lyme's and mostly it's presumed Lyme's." 7 sec, Dr. Landauer.

Often the illness is only presumed Lyme's because the disease is hard to test for. That's why doctors stress knowing the symptoms.

"Be vigilant and think Lyme disease because typically, it's not confirmed in any way. It's a disease of symptoms, suspicion, and findings," said Dr. Landauer.

And that's why Jeff Waite takes so much time to educate kids who spend lots of time outside. Because of his daughter's disease, Jeff commits his time to speaking with students.

"The kids are great, you know, they soak it up. There's not one of them that doesn't know someone who has had Lyme disease," says Jeff Waite.

But that doesn't mean we need to live in fear if we're well informed.

"The main thing is get outside, have a good time, check for ticks every day, and watch for the symptoms," says Dr. Landauer.

Those steps can help you avoid getting Lyme disease like Jeff's daughter Jennifer did.



Related Weblinks:
Center for Disease Control

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

RHINELANDER - On Monday night, a special Rhinelander city council meeting took place, in part, to discuss the city administrator position.

Back in February, Keith Kost started working as a part-time City Administrator. Kost's contract was set to end in December.

+ Read More

Play Video

WAUSAU - Earlier this month an inmate assaulted a teacher at the Lincoln Hills School and Youth Prison. Many youth counselors and teachers have reached out to Newswatch12 to express their concerns about staff safety and well-being. 

Last Wednesday, Jon Litscher, the Secretary of the Department of Corrections, met with staff in Irma to listen to their concerns. Monday, he spoke to Newswatch12 in Wausau. 

Assaults, long hours, and claims of an unsafe work environment made some staff members of Lincoln Hills School and Youth Prison angry at the Department of Corrections and management that oversees the facility.
 
But Litscher believes that the only way to solve issues facing the prison is to come together.

+ Read More

LINCOLN COUNTY -
Update:

The man who died when his ATV hit a bear in Lincoln County lived in Tomahawk.

Lincoln County Sheriff's deputies tell us 51-year-old Kevin Ives died in the accident northwest of Tomahawk Thursday night.

Ives had been headed west on County Road CC, east of Poplar Drive in the town of Wilson.

The ATV rolled when it hit the bear, and Ives was thrown off.

He was taken to the hospital but died of his injuries.

+ Read More

Play Video

MERRILL - Merrill will soon open a new homeless shelter after going without one for nearly two years.

"Since October of 2016 to about last month, we had over 136 homeless people, that included 16 families and that included 38 children," said Merrill Homeless Center Board member Dee Olsen.

Olsen received the keys to the new building on Friday.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - A walk down a gravel driveway and up a leaf-covered path in the Town of Crescent led Lon Roberts to one of Oneida County's prized projects.

"People who are trying to get into the process should look at what Oneida County has done," Roberts said.

Roberts is the new state Public Service Commission commissioner, which is the agency that regulates utilities across Wisconsin and doles out grant funding for broadband projects.  Monday morning, Roberts got to see one of more than a dozen broadband internet towers Northwoods Connect and the county put up in the last two years.

+ Read More

MADISON - Enrollment in Wisconsin private school vouchers programs increased nearly 8 percent this year.

The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction released totals Monday for enrollment in the programs operating statewide and in Milwaukee and Racine. Under the programs, students can receive a taxpayer-funded voucher to attend private schools.

+ Read More

MADISON - A Wisconsin tribe is set to grow hemp in hopes of extracting oil from the plant that could help treat seizures and other health problems.

The Wisconsin State Journal reports the St. Croix Chippewa plan to begin production at the end of the month.

Parents of children who suffer seizures contend cannabidiol oil, a hemp extract, can help ease symptoms.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 





Click Here