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Sen. Baldwin delivers first Senate floor speechSubmitted: 05/22/2013

Lane Kimble
Managing Editor/Anchor
lkimble@wjfw.com


WASHINGTON, D.C. - We got to see and hear Wisconsin Senator Tammy Baldwin give her first speech on the floor Wednesday morning.

The first-term Senator focused mainly on optimism and bipartisanship during her 11-minute speech.

She spoke on a day when the Senate took up debate on the so-called 2013 Farm Bill.

The bi-partisan effort would help limit the risks many farmers take while saving taxpayers billions. It's the kind of work Baldwin would like to see the Senate do more of.

"Wisconsin's a dairy state and I think about some of the time dairy farmers take some of the biggest risks around and have no guarantee that they'll profit from year to year," Baldwin said. "We need to take some of that risk out and make sure that our farmers are able to manage some of the risks that they face in their industry."

Baldwin's first speech also comes during a week when the executive branch is under high scrutiny.

Both parties are attacking President Obama's administration over wire tapping, the Benghazi terrorist attack and unfair IRS targeting.

Baldwin thinks Congress can help find out who's responsible for all three.

"The legislative branch, the Congress, is holding hearings and is conducting oversight and looking into this and calling it out," Baldwin said. "And so I do think that when committees like one I serve on--the Homeland Security and Government Affairs committee--has an investigative branch to it, that's how we're going to make sure that wrongdoers are held to account.

Baldwin also extended her thoughts to the Oklahoma tornado victims.

We reached out to Senator Ron Johnson's office for response. Senator Johnson was unavailable.

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