Loading

-13°F

-18°F

-12°F

-17°F

-17°F

-20°F

-17°F

-7°F

-17°F

-21°F

-7°F

-17°F
NEWS STORIES

Steamroller Used For Printing ArtSubmitted: 05/04/2013
Story By Shardaa Gray


Photos By Shardaa Gray

WAUSAU - Sometimes a steamroller and a piece of fabric is all you need to create a masterpiece.

"Today we're taking visual arts to a whole other level using a steamroller to print over-sized woodblocks that have been carved by area high school students this spring." said Woodson Art Museum Director, Kathy Foley.

Colorado artist Sherrie York says this heavy undertaking started when she had a talk with one of the curators at the Woodson Art Museum.

"She asked me what the largest print I had ever done and because I print with my hand, I don't use a press." Colorado artist, Sherrie York said.

"In my regular work I told her well, about this big, but one of these days I would like to do something really big. You know, steamroller size."

So a steamroller it was, but she couldn't do it on her own.

Local students pitched in.

"It was a hard process because with woodcuts you make a mistake, you can't fix it," said DC Everest Art teacher, Melissa Clay Reissmann.

"You just have to incorporate it into the designs."

"A lot of the pieces had lots of details. We had just really tiny tools that weren't the sharpest," DC Everest student, Katie Koenig said.

"So it took forever to carve everything out and outline everything make sure you cut out all the right parts."

While a steamroller may be extreme, this method is pretty common.

"If you've ever used a rubber stamp, or made a potato print, you understand the basic principal of relief printing." York said.

While anyone can say they used a stamp, not may can say their work of art was made with a steamroller.


Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

WAUSAU - Community health centers could soon face a budget problem if funding levels don't stay sustained. The issue revolves around funding from a dedicated five-year "Health Center Fund" through the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

+ Read More

Play Video

CRANDON - Prosecutors want a Wabeno man to go to prison for at least 30 years.

Justin Bey pleaded guilty on Wednesday to trying to kill a man in Forest County last March.

+ Read More

Play Video

MERRILL - Six groups in Merrill that offer services to the community got a new home in February.

They moved to the Ministry Good Samaritan Campus.

+ Read More

Play Video

WHITE LAKE - You still have time to guess when "Iron Mike," White Lake's winter tradition, will fall through the ice.

Iron Mike is a friendly mannequin that sits on White Lake throughout the winter. He disappeared for a few decades, but he's back in 2015.

+ Read More

Play Video

MINOCQUA - Students in one Northwoods school turned their classrooms into a "portal to the past" this week. Students took what they've learned about ancient civilizations and brought them to life for their peers and the community.

+ Read More

Play Video

EAGLE RIVER - The 25th and final Klondike Days will start in Eagle River this weekend.

The event is often called Wisconsin's #1 Winter Family Fun Festival.

+ Read More

Play Video

CRANDON - Hayes Metals in Crandon will see big changes over the coming weeks. Laona Machine Supply bought the repair shop on Monday.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here