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NEWS STORIES

Steamroller Used For Printing ArtSubmitted: 05/04/2013
Story By Shardaa Gray


Photos By Shardaa Gray

WAUSAU - Sometimes a steamroller and a piece of fabric is all you need to create a masterpiece.

"Today we're taking visual arts to a whole other level using a steamroller to print over-sized woodblocks that have been carved by area high school students this spring." said Woodson Art Museum Director, Kathy Foley.

Colorado artist Sherrie York says this heavy undertaking started when she had a talk with one of the curators at the Woodson Art Museum.

"She asked me what the largest print I had ever done and because I print with my hand, I don't use a press." Colorado artist, Sherrie York said.

"In my regular work I told her well, about this big, but one of these days I would like to do something really big. You know, steamroller size."

So a steamroller it was, but she couldn't do it on her own.

Local students pitched in.

"It was a hard process because with woodcuts you make a mistake, you can't fix it," said DC Everest Art teacher, Melissa Clay Reissmann.

"You just have to incorporate it into the designs."

"A lot of the pieces had lots of details. We had just really tiny tools that weren't the sharpest," DC Everest student, Katie Koenig said.

"So it took forever to carve everything out and outline everything make sure you cut out all the right parts."

While a steamroller may be extreme, this method is pretty common.

"If you've ever used a rubber stamp, or made a potato print, you understand the basic principal of relief printing." York said.

While anyone can say they used a stamp, not may can say their work of art was made with a steamroller.


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