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Persistent Lake Ice Puts Pressure on Guides', Resorts' BusinessSubmitted: 05/01/2013
Ben Meyer
Ben Meyer
Managing Editor / Senior Reporter
bmeyer@wjfw.com

Persistent Lake Ice Puts Pressure on Guides', Resorts' Business
CONOVER - Frozen lakes might make Saturday a fishing opener by name only, with most water inaccessable.

That's discouraging for Northwoods anglers, but could be even worse for those who rely on southern visitors.

People around Eagle River know him simply as Yukon Jack.

The fishing guide has been around the area for a long time.

But he can't remember too many times when lakes have had solid ice into May.

That could bite into the business of Yukon and other guides.

"Well, I had a couple of calls for opening day, and I said, bring your ice fishing gear, because we aren't going to get a boat in, and they put it off for two weeks," he says.

Yukon says the second week in May is when fishing starts getting popular for his customers.

But even that's no sure thing.

"I talked to one of the guides, and he's got a customer that booked him for five days starting on Monday after the opener, and he's a little bit frustrated, because he's not sure he's going to be able to get his boat in the water," he says.

Even with the late thaw, Yukon doesn't think the fishing patterns will be impacted much once the ice melts.

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