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Students Honor Their Superhero- Dick ScuglikSubmitted: 04/30/2013
Story By Hayley Tenpas


RHINELANDER - The nation celebrated National Superhero Day on Sunday, but we wanted to find a hero among us.

There's usually one person in our lives who's inspired us, encouraged us, and impacted us in a positive way.

You might call them your superhero.

Some Rhinelander students spoke about their own superhero and how his impact changed their lives.

"I don't think you can describe Dick in a few words"

But stubborn, compassionate and hard headed are a few that make the cut.

"He gave you the drive to make it through the course work, which was not easy. He just was a great inspiration," said student Jeff Headberg.

For 25 years, Dick Scuglik was the center of the IT department at Nicolet Technical College.

Over the decades, he transformed the program.

"He went through the whole process of changing it from data processing to information technology. Changing the focus of it from the AS 400 computing to desktop, networking," said his wife Kim Schey-Scuglik.

"Spending 25 years, building this program from scratch, and being the primary focus- he was the man to go to. He knew the program in and out," said his student Bob Klitzka.

Student Deb Christie saw a change in herself too. With the help of Dick, she got back in the classroom.

"He also encouraged me to the point where, you can do anything you set your mind to do and he said, 'You'd be very good at this,' and sometimes I told him he was full of it, but he was correct, he was correct," said Christie.

As Dick's students passed through the program, there was a change that no one was prepared for.

Dick was diagnosed with skin cancer in spring of 2011.

"The skin cancer spread to his spinal column, before we even realized- it took 40 years for it to spread that way," said Kim.

Radiation, chemotherapy and surgery were the next step.

Kim says even through chemo, he was stubborn as always.

"He told me, go to work, I'll get the chemo it'll be fine. So I called there in the afternoon and I talked to him and I said, how are you? And he says, I'm really tired, I did something stupid. I said what'd you do? He says, I rode my bike 5 miles. He was so frustrated and angry over the cancer," she said.
For a year, Dick fought.

But on June 14th 2012, Kim lost her husband.

Deb lost her teacher.

"I couldn't take that. I really couldn't. That hurt, because I was expecting to go through the whole course with him here. If not holding my hand at least, you know encouraging me," said Christie.

Dick can't be there for graduation day in May, but Deb wants to honor Dick by walking across that stage.

"I want to walk in cap and gown and get handed my diploma, and say 'This is for you, Dick, and I really think Dick is and was, a superhero."

Dick's students have established The Dick Scuglik Memorial Scholarship at Nicolet College.


Related Weblinks:
Dick Scuglik Memorial Scholarship

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