Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Bat Monitor Training Class In Eagle RiverSubmitted: 04/29/2013
Story By Shardaa Gray

Photos By Shardaa Gray

EAGLE RIVER - Bird watching can be a popular hobby in the northwoods.

But a group in Eagle River wants to find out more information on a different species that also flies.

People at Trees for Tomorrow had the chance to handle the equipment they will use to survey bats.

The purpose is to determine where bats are located and find as man as possible.

Teacher, Troy Walters says they don't have a lot of information on bats.

"I think there's a few threats these days that are really difficult for bats," said Walters.

"White nose syndrome and wind turbans and things like that are increasing problems for bats."

Saving bats from those threats is important.

Walters says bats serve a lot of purposes in wildlife.

"Number one they eat a lot of mosquitoes which is beneficial for us, but they do also eat some other pest on crops and so forth," Walters said.

"So they actually do provide not just an ecological service, but some of the monetary services as well."

Walters says you can survey anytime throughout the summer.

The next class will be sometime in May.

If you're interested in attending the class, you can call Troy Walters at 715-479-6456 extension 228 or email him at troy@treesfortomorrow.com.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

Play Video

LANGLADE COUNTY - It's a long season for the carnival.

"Twenty-one weeks of summer," said A + P Enterprise manager Pauline Kedrowicz.

From May to September, A + P Enterprise, based near Stevens Point, puts on carnivals in Wisconsin. This weekend it's at the Langlade County Fair.

+ Read More

Play Video

CRANDON - Nearly 200 vendors will make their way to Crandon this weekend for the annual Kentuck Day Festival.

Among them is a former nationally ranked snow-cross racer turned peanut brittle chef.

+ Read More

Play Video

ANTIGO - World-class athletes hope to etch their names into the history books during the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. But all the hard work isn't done by the athletes alone.

"I'm just going to focus on what I'm there for, and that's to do the best I can for my athletes," said Antigo native Dr. Curt Draeger.

+ Read More

Play Video

ANTIGO - When the Kretz family started the Kretz Lumber Company here in Antigo in 1929, they built part of the original saw mill with hemlock that grew near the property.  Now, a piece of hemlock far older than that serves as a reminder of the company's rich history.

+ Read More

Play Video

WHITE LAKE - There's a lot of pride in the Village of White Lake.

The people there are proud of their school, proud of their health center, and proud of their history.

"There's just so much history here. It's just a good little place," said White Lake Area Historical Society secretary Judy Popelka. 

+ Read More

Play Video

ANTIGO - In one way, Antigo Silt Loam isn't all that special.

"The reason the Antigo Silt Loam soil was selected wasn't that it represented the whole state, or exists throughout the whole state, or that it was the most productive," said Matt Ruark, an associate professor in the Soil Science department at UW-Madison.

But in 1983, it was selected as the official Wisconsin state soil for a special reason.

"It was the most uniquely 'Wisconsin,'" Ruark said.

+ Read More

WAUSAU - A 43-year-old Marathon County man will go to prison for more than a decade for incest after being convicted in Marathon County court Friday.

Micheal Mayville was originally charged with multiple counts of incest and second-degree sexual assault in two separate cases. Those assault charges were ultimately dismissed.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here