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NEWS STORIES

Taste Five Generations of Family Tradition at Ginter's Corner Tap N' SapSubmitted: 04/18/2013
Story By Lyndsey Stemm

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CRANDON - Last year maple syrup farmers suffered from the quick spring so badly, many had to take out emergency loans. This year they're the only one's not complaining about the slow thaw while the sap flows like crazy.

Tonight in Northwoods Works, Newswatch 12's Lyndse Stemm takes us to Ginter's Corner Tap N' Sap, where you can taste five generations of family tradition.

When the Ginter's say their maple syrup business is a family affair, they mean it. It started with great grandpa Ginter.

"Grandpa used to make it in an old kettle," says Tim Ginter.

Five generations later, syrup practically runs through their veins.

"This is our hobby gone wrong. We started out making 40 gallons and now we have expanded to where we want to eventually make 1,000 gallons a year," says Joan Ginter.

This year they're already on track to beat their old record of 600 gallons. It's a far-cry from last year when maple syrup producers around the state suffered from the fast spring.

"You rely on the weather. If it gets too warm then the trees quit running. If it gets too cold the trees quit. Ideal temperature, 45 during the day, 25 at night," says Tim.

The Ginter's now have between 2,400 and 2,500 taps on the property. Just this year they finished putting in lines, to bring the sap to holding tanks.

"It's expensive to put line in. So we started with one side, and then we waited a few years and then we put the other side in," says Joan.

The Ginter's invest their profits right back into the business. All this machinery saves them so much time, they're able to produce seven times as much as Great-Grandpa Ginter was able to during syrup season.

"Basically what we want to do is we want to be able to retire, and this is all we do," says Joan.

An even bigger dream is for the business to continue for generations after them.

"Hopefully I'll be able to pass it down like my grandpa did," says Tim.

"Oh, I'm almost positive it will be. Even if it isn't my kids or grand kids I have nephews that just love doing this stuff. It'll always be in the family," says Joan.

It shouldn't be a hard to find a relative to take over. The Ginter's sell out every year and the syrup is only sold in three stores in Crandon; the rest by word of mouth... all 750 gallons. Although, their family is responsible for a few of those cases.

"Probably three or four a year. But we can because we have it. So basically it's running through our veins. Literally," says Joan.



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