Loading

35°F

36°F

37°F

34°F

31°F

38°F

37°F

47°F

31°F

37°F

47°F

37°F
NEWS STORIES

Minocqua Marathoner Home Safe from BostonSubmitted: 04/17/2013

Ben Meyer
Executive Producer
bmeyer@wjfw.com


MINOCQUA - Co-workers of Matt Thomas hugged him more today than they ever have before.

He's a Minocqua runner who finished his fourth Boston Marathon just before two explosions killed three and injured almost two hundred of people.

"It was just completely different," Thomas said.

Thomas finished his fourth Boston Marathon Monday on what he called a perfect day to run.

Watching for two other Lakeland area friends to come to the finish line…

He said it was like loud, close fireworks or a Revolutionary War style cannon.

"People were like, is that normal? I said, 'I've been here for four years, and I've never seen anything like that'. I think it was about 20 seconds later, but , I don't know, time kind of goes funny, then, in that situation, the second explosion went off," Thomas said.

That was when he knew it was no accident, and no celebration.

"People got blown into the course, and the barricades got blown over by the blast. Right away, by seeing what had happened to the people and the barricades coming out into the course, you knew something was not right," said Thomas.

He looked around him for backpacks or trash cans that could be another bomb, and didn't see any.

Because of that, he decided not to move from his spot a couple hundred yards from the explosions.

Instead, he watched the emergency workers rushing to help.

"It was pretty incredible. To see the response - when the second blast went off, the first police cars and the first fire trucks, first two fire trucks and ambulance were there within seconds," Thomas said.

Boylston Street, once packed with thousands of people, was nearly deserted.

That took just minutes.

But it took closer to hours for the entire Northwoods group to reunite - all of them totally safe.

Thomas could take at least one positive from Monday - his marathon time qualifies him for next year's Boston.

So will he go back to run at that same place?

"My view is, I'm going to run Boston because, if you don't run Boston, then you're giving the people who did this exactly what they wanted which is, you're afraid of doing things you normally did," he said.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

MINOCQUA - In Wisconsin, the Great Lakes play an important role in our lives. A program in the Northwoods Wednesday night will take a closer look behind the science of those lakes.

This month's Science on Tap topic is "The Great Lakes, Great Challenges, Great Science." Dr. Jim Hurley from the UW-Madison Aquatic Sciences Center will be the featured speaker.

+ Read More

RHINELANDER - Ministry St. Mary's Hospital in Rhinelander will see some changes this year. Renovations to the hospital started March 16.

+ Read More

MERRILL - Police used to teach people at schools and public places to stay put and hide if they faced an active shooter situation.

But the Merrill Police Department is helping to change that thinking.

Analysis of mass shootings shows people who run or fight back often have a better chance of survival.

For example, during the Virginia Tech shootings in 2007, 28 of the 30 people who were killed reacted passively, not proactively.

+ Read More

TOMAH - Whistleblowers and family members of veterans who died at a Tomah Department of Veterans Affairs medical center say they want lawmakers to enforce accountability and reform the hospital.


+ Read More

MILWAUKEE - The City of Milwaukee is proposing paying $6.5 million to a man wrongly convicted of a 1995 murder.

+ Read More

WISCONSIN - Gogebic Taconite won't seek an iron ore mine in northern Wisconsin, but the company's announcement last month isn't enough for the Sierra Club.

The environmental group wants a repeal of the state law that relaxed the mine permitting process.

+ Read More

RHINELANDER - Some landowners don't want to make changes to their land because they worry those changes will hurt wildlife. But biologists say the opposite is true.

The Wisconsin Young Forest Partnership's goal is to help landowners improve young forest habitat on their properties.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here