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NEWS STORIES

Simpson Electric Stands the Test of Time in Lac du FlambeauSubmitted: 04/17/2013
Story By Kailey Burton


Photos By Kailey Burton

LAC DU FLAMBEAU - What do auto mechanics, railroad operators, and NASA have in common? They all use an instrument built right here in Northern Wisconsin.

Simpson Electric embodies the heart of the Northwoods, quality, detailed labor, and pride in craftsmanship.

Those principles have served them well since 1934. In 1927 Ray Simpson built a key piece of equipment that allowed Charles Lindbergh to fly solo across the Atlantic. Today they build thousands of electric meters for a variety of clients.

"We sell to every branch of the military, we have NASA, the government orders, so it can go from the everyday user, all the way up into space. Our meters have been on Apollo 13," said Bill Conn, CEO of Simpson Electric.

Almost everything sold by Simpson Electric is made -starting with the tiniest pieces- right here, BY HAND.

From metal parts stamped and assembled on site to hair-fine wires spooled by hand. Each employee carefully checks the product at each stage. That dedication is what they're known for.

"We watch for the quality, we watch for the goodness in the meter before it goes out, and that's what keeps me here, the dedication to the company and the employees… And, it works," said Agnes Jack, Simpson Electric employee.

"I've had men come in and say, 'I dropped my meter 30 feet... What do you think?' And it usually works," said Conn, "So we're very proud of that meter, and we still build and sell about 60 of them every day. That's quality work."

Simpson Electric in Lac du Flambeau welcomes the public to come in for a tour.


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