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Forestry Program Provides Graduates for a Growing IndustrySubmitted: 03/25/2013
Story By Hayley Tenpas


ANTIGO - The first graduating class from a Northwoods forestry program will receive their diplomas this May, and most of them have job offers.

It's a program that's taking the forest industry to another level.

But it's not just about the trees.

It's about jobs.

"We're just trying to develop the best possible people for this industry that we can," said Brown.

Northcentral Technical College's Wood Tech program is teaching future forest industry employees, right in Antigo.

"The equipment that we have here on the floor, the curriculum that we teach here at NTC is very unique, and it is cutting edge. It's what employers are looking for when they're hiring new employees," said instructor Travis Allen.

The forestry industry job market looks good too.

With almost 60 thousand jobs in Wisconsin in 2011, compared to 52 thousand in 2010, according to the DNR.

Oradei sees it as a sustainable job market too.

"It's a very desirable industry to be involved with; you're always working with a renewable resource," said Oradei.

Brown is happy to see business growing.

"Business has picked up in the united states and worldwide, so it's getting a lot more fun," said Brown.

Sixteen students in Travis Allen's class are hearing from employers too.

"A week ago I had three different employers contact us for skilled employees, and the nice thing is our curriculum is covering exactly what they want to hire on," said Allen.


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 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 05/26/2016

- We'll give you a Wausau chiropractor's reaction to a proposed state bill that would allow chiropractors to write prescriptions for narcotics.

- Plus, we asked Governor Scott Walker for his reaction to the transgender directive for which the Obama administration is being sued by several states including Wisconsin.

We'll bring you the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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AMHERST - The small town of Amherst recently broke ground to replace their aging dam.

The dam was built on the Tomorrow River decades ago for power to the local feed mill.

The Wisconsin DNR believes the structure does not meet it's 500 year flood criteria.

This designation gave the town residents a choice.

"The determination of the DNR that the dam had to meet the 500 year flood lead us to the idea that we had to be able to release more water. The DNR basically brought this to the forefront and the village responded then," says Amherst Village President Michael Juris

This close knit town of just over 1000 residents took the decision very seriously.

"The residents of the village really had the opportunity to speak on what they wanted the vision of their village to be for the future. Whether to maintain the dam and the pond or to take it out and rehab it," says Juris.

Residents chose to keep the dam and thus the millpond.

With the decision made, the bidding process moved quickly and work has just started.

The new improved structure will use parts of the current one.

"Basically the stop plug structure of the dam is going to remain as it is because we found that in order to meet the 500 year flood requirements of the DNR we're going to be able to use the water that flows through the generating station," states Juris.

There were many options on the table and some that were just too expensive.

"It's been our determination that to dredge the millpond would be an expense that the taxpayers of the village at this time aren't going to be able to shoulder," says Juris

Still, bracing the structure to meet the DNR's strict 500 year criteria does not come cheap.

"We spent a fair amount of time in discussion before this decision was made because this is an expensive decision for a community our size. The original estimate was around 1.2 million dollars," says Juris.

Work moves quickly in Amherst as a completion date is set for this September.

"We expect that the substantial completion will be towards the end of August and with final completion early in September," says Juris.

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THREE LAKES - First responders respond to different emergency calls every day. 

Those calls can be more challenging if they are trying to help someone who has autism.

A Northwoods group is encouraging local fire and police departments to train how to work with people with autism.

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LANGLADE COUNTY - Langlade County wants to become the new home for the state's forestry headquarters.

Lawmakers have asked the DNR to consider moving the department's headquarters from Madison to northern Wisconsin.

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MEQUON - Authorities say remains found in the Milwaukee River have been identified as those of a Mequon woman who disappeared in November.

The Milwaukee County Medical Examiner's Office used dental records to identify 53-year-old Jacquelyn Ranallo.

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MADISON - Wisconsin is joining a multi-state lawsuit against the Obama administration over its directive to U.S. public schools to let transgender students use the bathrooms and locker rooms matching their gender identity.

The lawsuit was announced by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and filed in federal court in Texas on Wednesday.

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RHINELANDER - You probably hear from your doctor or loved ones how important cancer screenings can be.

But getting one isn't always affordable if you don't have insurance or not enough coverage.

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