Boulder Junction Book Club Beats the Winter BlahsSubmitted: 03/17/2013
Story By Lyndsey Stemm

Boulder Junction Book Club Beats the Winter Blahs
BOULDER JUNCTION - With the holidays long gone, the ice and snow melt around the corner... what's a girl to do during that in-between period in the Northwoods? Some ladies in Boulder Junction know just how to beat those winter blahs.

The Boulder Junction Book Club has been at it for eleven years.

"Once we start talking we can't stop," says Missy Drake, a Boulder Junction Library Volunteer.

The club gathers every January to select ten books for the year. Then once a month they come to the Boulder Junction Library to talk about the book for that month.

"It started originally meeting here. We all really like that because it doesn't put the onus of preparation on anyone," says Drake.

And it helps keep them on topic without the distractions of food and drink many other book clubs have.

Co-founder Missy Drake says input from other people on the topics they read about can be enlightening.

"It draws out so many different ideas not only just from the book but everyone comes to the story with a different background. You learn so much about the people that you're talking to," says Drake.

This group likes a challenge-- you'll find no "Chick Lit" here.

"We don't do those. We do tackle some really good literature, I think," says Drake.

Members say it's the perfect way to spend your time when things might be a little slow at the beginning of the year.
"We're all very active. But there are many days, up here especially, that are indoor days and great reading days," says Drake.

Most importantly you don't have to be a woman, and you don't have to be able to make every meeting if you're a seasonal resident. Meetings usually have anywhere from eight to 16 people.

"Everyone's invited. Everyone is very welcome. We are just an open group and always welcome more people," says Drake.

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