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Northwoods Children's Museum Receives Needed DonationSubmitted: 03/14/2013
Story By Kailey Burton


EAGLE RIVER - Where do kids learn the most? Is it at a school desk, or on a field trip? One place in Eagle River combines the best of both worlds.

The Northwoods Children's Museum is a truly special place. Some, are even moved to tears by it...

"You see kids having a really good time… Once in a while you see them crying when they have to go home," said Ken Nimmer, the museum's board president, "They really like to be here."

As the museum's board president and a retired school psychologist Ken and Lynne Nimmer understand how important playing is for children to learn and grow.

"Kids learn through doing and hands-on, and everything here is touchable."

This museum is the perfect classroom- It's 23 exhibits of fun and valuable lessons.

"Every one of them teach different things," said Rouleen Gartner, the Northwoods Children's Museum Director, "Whether it's science, reading, just how to be a professional in the work-field."

For 15 years kids have ENJOYED learning and exploring at the Northwoods Children's Museum. It's a place where families can connect and have fun. But places like this don't exist without help from the community.

"Sometimes the hardest part is just to find the money to keep things operating," said Nimmer.

Revenue for the museum dropped 30% in the last 2 years. That's more than half their budget- the rest comes from donors.

"When it decreases that much, it really hurts us," said Gartner. "So we definitely have to find other support to help keep the doors open, and keep us viable in this community."

Luckily they've got their supporters. The Nimmer's and an annoymous donor gave $15,000 to the museum. That's a lot of lessons and a lot of smiles. They'd like YOUR help to keep them coming.


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