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Gov. Walker, Sen. Baldwin reflect on post-sequester battleSubmitted: 03/05/2013

Lane Kimble
Managing Editor/Anchor
lkimble@wjfw.com


WASHINGTON, D.C. - The President promised we'd start to feel the effects of the sequester soon. But not everyone's convinced he did enough to stop them from happening.

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker was in Washington last month. He and other governors met with President Obama to give him their take on the budget crisis.

"One of the suggestions I raised to the President of the United States was that if he didn't like, and I think most of us agree, the arbitrary nature of the sequester cuts, the perfect alternative is for him to do what most governors have done over the last two years, and that is bring his cabinet in, put together a responsible list of reductions, and provide it as an alternative," Walker said.

But Democrats disgree on where spending cuts should come from.

Wisconsin Senator Tammy Baldwin thinks there are way too many tax loopholes for the rich.

"The Buffett Rule is one of them," Baldwin said. "That says the simple fact that someone who makes over $100,000,000 or $2,000,000 per year should not pay at a lower tax rate using multiple loopholes than middle class, hardworking families. Another one is just closing the loopholes, the incentives in our tax code for companies that ship jobs overseas."

Senator Baldwin also agrees the government needs to spend less money.

But she doesn't agree with the programs Republicans necessarily want to cut.

The forced sequester cuts totaled $85 billion affecting government and military programs across the nation.

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 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 05/02/2016

- Last month, voters in the Unified School District of Antigo rejected a referendum that would have consolidated the district's seven elementary schools. Now the district has to figure out what to do with the teachers, staff and students of one school that will close in June.

- Plus, until now Price County has never had any type of public transportation.  Park Falls hasn't even had a taxi service in years.  That all changed in April with a new bus.

We'll have the details on this story and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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MATTOON - Last month, voters in the Unified School District of Antigo rejected a referendum that would have consolidated the district's seven elementary schools. The referendum would have kept two rural schools -Mattoon and Crestwood -open.

But now, Mattoon Elementary School will close at the end of this school year. The school board voted 5-4 to close the school this June.

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EAGLE RIVER - Today's manufacturing industry relies on an increasing knowledge of science, technology, and mathematics. And thanks to a grant awarded to the Northland Pines School District, teachers will be able to provide their students with the latest technology that the manufacturing industry has to offer.

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EAGLE RIVER - Riding through forests and past scenic lakes make the Northwoods one of the best places to go ATVing.

Routes opened for the season at 8 a.m. Sunday in Vilas County.

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LINCOLN COUNTY - The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office warns people to clean up your campsite before you leave or face a fine. That's after this past weekend, where people left a messy site at the Underdown camping area in Gleason.

The Forestry Department saw people left litter including a mattress at the site. The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office say there's zero tolerance for littering.

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WAUSAU - The Mayor of Wausau blames "a violent world", in part, for this weekend's officer involved shooting.

A Wausau police officer shot and killed a man allegedly armed with a knife late Saturday night.

Mayor Robert Mielke said that he believes the shooting was justified and the entire police force has his full support.

"It's a very sad situation," said Mielke. "It's sad for the family involved with the individual. But it's also very sad for the officer involved and the other officers involved. It's a traumatic thing. But we're going to get through this and we're going to heal through this."

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PARK FALLS - Park Falls' Bob Kranig hadn't been to the grocery store in three years, by his estimation.

"I've got to rely on other people," he said.

Getting to the store himself was simply too tough. Kranig doesn't walk or drive. He mostly stays in his motorized wheelchair, which he calls his scooter.

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