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NEWS STORIES

Under the Gun: The State of Gun Violence in Wis.Submitted: 02/13/2013
Story By Lyndsey Stemm


MILWAUKEE - Owning a gun is a right in America in a way that doesn't exist in any other part of the world.

It's also at the heart of a vibrant sporting culture we're very familiar with here in the Northwoods.

But other parts of the state have a more contentious relationship with guns.

Newswatch 12's Lyndsey Stemm was allowed to ride along with Milwaukee police officers. She sat down with the Chief of Police and the County Sheriff.

Up here in the North gun violence is statistically rare, but in some parts of Milwaukee, there's a battle going on between police and criminals.

"My God, there's 300 million weapons out there already," says Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn.

Flynn's officers seize 2,000 of them every year from criminals.

Though Milwaukee can be portrayed as a hotbed of crime, in reality only eight percent of city territory accounts for 90 percent of its violent crime.

"There are different kinds of gun violence. And I think the tragedy in Newtown has certainly focused the attention of our citizens on one type of gun violence. And that is the low probability, high hazard event of a mass murder," says Flynn.

Milwaukee police have had to deal with two in just a few short months.

"Both Azana Spa and Sikh temple shooting put our bomb techs right on the front line," says Captain Jason Smith, Milwaukee Police Intelligence Commander.

"The other type of violence is hand gun-related, and central city-related. And it's very much the phenomenon of people who are engaged in criminal enterprises murdering each other," says Flynn.

"A lot of guns are taken in burglaries," says Timothy Keller, an officer with the Milwaukee Police Department Tactical Enforcement Unit.

It does happen. But only eight to ten percent of guns used in crimes are stolen. There are other methods criminals are using to get their hands on guns.

"If they're not stolen you can get the straw purchases. We'll see cases like that here in local gun stores," says Keller.

"What we found was a large number of women that were purchasing the guns and then they ended up in a felon's hands," says Dr. Mallory O'Brien, from the Milwaukee Homicide Review Commission.

That leaves law enforcement with the problem of how to keep criminals from getting guns, and finding the line between appropriate gun control and infringing on second amendment rights.

"The percentage of people who use firearms to commit violence, versus the overall population of gun owners... it's very small," says Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke.

"I think what you have to recognize, is where you stand on this issue often directly relates to where you live and your experience with firearms," says Flynn.

But people on the front lines dealing with gun violence agree it's not just a big city problem.

"Well it's not my problem. Well I guess it's not my problem if the right of an American to safety depends on their zip code, I guess It's not your problem," says Flynn.

Tomorrow we'll see how Chief Flynn and Sheriff Clarke think we should go about finding that balance between gun control and second amendment rights.

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 IN OTHER NEWS

GREEN BAY - Lambeau field should be safe from being renamed to make money.

The president of the Green Bay Packers doesn't want to sell the naming rights to Lambeau Field.

Mark Murphy says it doesn't make sense to put a corporate tag on the name of the historic stadium.

Murphy talked to shareholders at the franchise's annual meeting on Tuesday at Lambeau.

Stadium naming rights have become a way for professional sports teams to make a lot of money.

The Packers are not hurting for cash.

They made $375-million in revenue in 2015.

(Copyright 2015 Associated Press - All Rights Reserved)

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SUPERIOR - Investigators think they know why two skydiving planes crashed mid-air near Superior two years ago.

They blame a lack of guidance from the Federal Aviation Administration and improper training.

The crash happened in November 2013.

All nine skydivers on the two planes and one pilot jumped to safety.

The other pilot landed the damaged plane.

The National Transportation Safety Board says the FAA doesn't have many rules on how pilots should fly formation flights with skydivers.

Because of that, the owner of the skydiving company did not give its pilots training.

Footage from helmet cameras shows one plane coming down on the back of another, damaging the lead plane's right wing.

(Copyright 2015 Associated Press - All Rights Reserved)

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RC group to keep track openSubmitted: 07/29/2015

CRANDON -

Team No Limit Racing will run a new track behind the former RC Havok building in Crandon. RC Havok was an RC car rental store and track that provided kids and families affordable racing. No Limit Racing wants to make sure kids can continue to race without breaking the bank.

"The biggest goal of this track is to give kids that don't have anything something to do," explained Track Manager Steve Sadnick, Jr. "Something they can play on, and something to keep them out of trouble. "I wish I had something like this when I was a kid."


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OCONTO - A tree from northeast Wisconsin will take center stage at the White House for the 2016 holiday season.

Whispering Pines Tree Farm in Oconto says it has won the National Christmas Tree Association's competition.

That means a tree from Whispering Pines will be on display in the Blue Room of the White House next year.

White House staff members get final say on which tree is selected.

The National Christmas Tree Association has presented the official White House Christmas tree since 1966.


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PEARSON - People from Wisconsin camp all the time, but it's not every day a group of British Boy Scouts comes to camp in the Northwoods for a week. 

"As a group, we've never been to the United States of America before, " said Troop Leader Stephen Bell.

Bell can cross that off his list. He's one of 11 British Boy Scouts and leaders staying at Camp Ma-Ka-Ja-Wan this week.

"We were looking for somewhere to extend the stay, so after a Google search, this site appeared to be the best one in the local area, so we headed up here for the rest of our time in the US," said Bell.

The 1st Carlton Colville Air Scouts come from the eastern coast of England in Lowestoft, about three and a half hours from London.

After spending time at the EAA event in Oshkosh, the troop came to Pearson for the week. It cost more than $30,000 and two years to make the trip happen. 

"I'm certainly not disappointed having arrived," said Bell.

Now that they're here, scouts say there are many differences from home. 

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RHINELANDER - Kids these days don't learn like older generations did—they rely on technology.

Some Rhinelander teachers went to school Tuesday to learn about tools like coding and green screens. It's part of a week-long even called Hodag Tech Fest at James Williams Middle School.

It's the second year the school district has hosted the forum for classroom technology, and about 90 Rhinelander teachers and administrators will attend throughout the week. Some of the seminars cover iPads, Chromebooks, Smart Boards and coding. 

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RHINELANDER - It wouldn't be summer in Rhinelander without watching worms race. The 29th annual worm races were held at the Rhinelander District Library on Tuesday. Children and parents from all around the area came out to participate.

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