Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Will It Pass? - Looking at school district referendums: Northland PinesSubmitted: 02/07/2013
Story By Lex Gray & Kira Lynne

Will It Pass? - Looking at school district referendums: Northland Pines
EAGLE RIVER - When you step into a Northland Pines school, you'll see laptops, iPads, and Chromebooks.

"I would say within five years, we may not even see a textbook in the the classroom anymore," Superintendent Mike Richie said. "It's going to be chromebooks, it's going to be ipads, and those kinds of things."

Even the schools themselves look shiny and new.

So you might ask yourself: why is this district asking taxpayers for more money?

Superintendent Mike Richie says there are a few answers to that question.

One goes all the way back to the early 90s, when the state funding formula started to change.

"That first base year to figure out what the cap would be for each district, it was actually based off the prior year. So any district in the state that was very frugal or did a great job with their tax levy was actually punished for future years," Richie said.

And Pines is frugal. The district stretched their last three year referendum to four years.

And this time, they're asking for $2.7 million per year instead of $2.9 million.

But there are still budget issues they can't get around.

Transportation costs are a huge issue here. While other districts are more compact, Northland Pines covers a large area, and that's why they spend $1.3 million per year just getting kids to and from school.

Any sympathy from the state? Not here.

"That is the problem I have with the funding formula," Richie said. "They don't take into account the makeup of the district and the difference that one district may have over another district."

And that's why Northland Pines is asking YOU to see the difference…and make sure they can stay ahead of the curve.

Technology director Scott Foster says it's not just about having the latest tech toys. Next year, the district may add Chinese language classes.

"We really emphasize providing a 21st century education for our students and connecting them to the global society. And with technology, we're allowed to do that," Foster said.

But even closer to home, technology matters.

"If a community member reflects on their job now even compared to five years ago... there isn't a job out there that hasn't been impacted by technology in any way," Foster said.

And in the long run, technology should save time. And time saves money.

It always comes across as expensive. But really, if you're enacting technology properly, you should be doing it do gain efficiencies in our instruction or the way we do our jobs here as educators.

Pines hosted informational meetings in January and posted slideshows, videos and flyers online. It's a lot of information. But what Richie really wants you to remember?

"This referendum is about what makes this school district a quality school district," Richie said.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

Play Video

ONEIDA COUNTY - A 53-year-old Lake Tomahawk man faces up to 40 years in jail for sexually assaulting a child in a Lake Tomahawk house. 

Robert Aufrere appeared in Oneida County Court Tuesday. 

Detective Sergeant Kelly Moermond testified that Aufrere admitted to touching the victim's hair, inner thigh, and private parts in an interview with sheriff's deputies. 

Aufrere often slept in the same bed as the child. 

The victim first told a grandmother about the assault. The victim's father then reported the assault to the Lac du Flambeau police.


+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Police and families always hope to find their loved ones safe if they disappear. But in rural counties, it can be difficult to find lost people quickly.

+ Read More

Play Video

MOSINEE - Professional athletes tend to develop scar tissue, suffer from arthritis, and wear out their joints at a fast rate.

For the Green Bay Packers, that's a reality players face after games and even practices. 

"I feel like I've been in a car crash at the end of the day, said offensive tackle David Bakhtiari. "Pretty much do that once a week."

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Freezing-cold days like the Northwoods is seeing this week usually make people avoid anything wet. But a pair of Rhinelander Parks Department workers did the opposite Tuesday, breaking out a hose hooked up to a fire hydrant.

Parks Director Jeremy Biolo and a coworker sprayed down the green space in front of Trig's for several hours.  They were forming the first of many layers for a new skating rink outside the grocery store.  Biolo says it's a slow process that will take a few days.

+ Read More

Play Video

ONEIDA COUNTY - A long stretch of frigid weather usually puts ice fishermen in a good mood.

So far this month, there have been eight days with temperatures below freezing.

But the DNR warns that the ice still may not be safe this early in the season.

+ Read More

ELCHO - An Elcho couple's Christmas tradition now serves as a tradition for many others in the Northwoods.

Carl and Lissa Bloechl spent only a week setting up thanks to the stretch of warm weather early in the season.

It's common for the couple to drop everything to take an emergency EMT call, which adds time to decorating.
 
They say they can't stop the display though.

+ Read More

MADISON - The state Department of Natural Resources Board is set to review the 2017 gun deer hunt.

The board will hear a presentation from Chief Warden Todd Schaller during a meeting Tuesday afternoon in Madison.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 





Click Here