Tomahawk School District Gets New TechnologySubmitted: 02/05/2013
Story By Shardaa Gray

TOMAHAWK - When you help your children with homework, you probably grab a pen and a piece of paper.

One local district is using a different method to teach their students.

Students at Tomahawk Middle and High School already have some experience with new technology.

This fall, every single student will have a Google Chromebook.

They're like Macbooks, but less expensive and more efficient.

This new laptop will give the students and teachers the chance to communicate inside and outside the classroom.

German Teacher and Blended Learning Designer, Brian Casey, said they can do almost anything that they couldn't do two years ago.

"I just scheduled an interview for next month on Google hangouts with a Holocaust survivor at the national Holocaust museum," said Casey.

"We're doing that on Google hangouts. That wouldn't have happened last year and it's happening now."

Taking a test or quiz may be a little less stressful after using the new laptops.

Sophomore Heidi Massa says it's easier to work with others using the Chromebook.

"I know a lot of kids can type faster than they write so that will allow you to elaborate more," Massa said.

"For multiple choice test, it will be fine because it saves paper and it's not any harder or less hard. It also gives you immediate feedback, which is nice."

The district is paying for the laptops with a grant so it won't cost the taxpayers anything.

They're using the money from Microsoft settlement.

Teachers and students think it's a great investment.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com


MADISON - Two Republican legislators have created a bill that would shift federal road dollars from local projects to major state projects. Opponents say the bill is a backdoor attempt to make sure federal prevailing wage requirements don't apply to local projects.

The bill sponsored by Sen. Duey Stroebel and Rep. Rob Brooks would transfer $47 million in federal funding from local projects to state projects and move $47 million in state dollars from state projects to local ones.

Stroebel says the swap would save money by removing local projects from burdensome federal regulations.

He has been a vocal advocate for doing away with prevailing wage statutes, which require minimum salaries for workers on government-funded construction projects.

Spokeswomen for GOP legislative leaders didn't respond to inquiries about the bill's chances.

+ Read More

MADISON - New state data show that nearly 15,000 Wisconsin residents lost access to food stamps in the first three months of a new law that requires some recipients to seek jobs.

The Wisconsin State Journal reports (http://bit.ly/1Ple8j5 ) it obtained the data from the Department of Human Services under the state open records law.

The rule took effect in April for participants in the state's food stamp program, FoodShare. It requires able-bodied adults without children living at home to work at least 80 hours a month or look for work to stay in the program.

The DHS data show about 25 percent of the 60,000 recipients eligible to work were dropped from the program between July and September. But about 4,500 found work through a new job training program for FoodShare recipients.

+ Read More

WOODRUFF - If they haven't already, people will start bringing out the Christmas decorations.

And it wouldn't be complete without that perfect Christmas tree.

+ Read More

MINOCQUA - It's that time of year again.

Minocqua kicked off its' Christmas celebrations Saturday.

+ Read More

MOUNT HOREB - A southern Wisconsin school district has cancelled plans for elementary school students to read a children's book about a transgender girl after a group threatened to sue.

+ Read More

WAUSAU - This has been Wisconsin's deadliest gun-deer season in the past five years, with two shooting fatalities already recorded.

+ Read More

TOMAH - The Tomah Veterans Affairs Medical Center says it has adopted another plan to improve patient care.

The La Crosse Tribune reports that Friday's release of the "100-day plan" comes almost 11 months after media reports that veterans at the center were prescribed excessive doses of opioid painkillers and that employees who spoke out faced retaliation from top officials.

+ Read More
+ More General News

Click Here