Loading

51°F

51°F

49°F

52°F

49°F

52°F

49°F

55°F

49°F

49°F

55°F

49°F
Search
NEWS STORIES

Huge, Divinely-Inspired Bible Camp Struck DownSubmitted: 02/05/2013

Ben Meyer
Executive Producer
bmeyer@wjfw.com


WOODBORO - God told the Jaros family to build a huge Bible camp on Squash Lake west of Rhinelander.

That's what the family told a federal court.

But the court is now telling the family they'll need to look somewhere else.

The Jaros family claimed divine calling when they decided to build a Bible camp fit for hundreds of people on the lake.

That process started seven years ago.

It was designed to have an indoor archery range, climbing wall, and even a train to take campers from the road into camp.

The only problem is this area of Squash Lake is zoned by Oneida County for quiet, single family homes, with not much noise, not many buildings, and not many people.

So the Jaros' went to elected officials to try and change that.

"Those petitions were not approved by the Town of Woodboro. Oneida County looked at it and did not approve them either. That was affirmed by the Oneida County Board," said Karl Jennrich, the Oneida Co. Planning and Zoning Director.

After that rejection, the family took the case to U.S. District Court.

They said a Religious Land Use act protected their right to build.

But Friday, Judge William Conley sent an even stronger rejection their way.

He said, "Patently obvious is this court's inability to discern whether the
plaintiffs' utter lack of success to date is God's way of telling them...to look elsewhere for a more acceptable location. Ultimately, only God knows if they should continue to knock at this particular door or look for an open window somewhere else."

"We respectfully disagree with some of the conclusions that the court reached, and we're going to appeal the decision," said Roman Storzer, the attorney for Eagle Cove.

That appeal goes to the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago.

But for now, there's no massive Bible camp in the works.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

Play Video

ARMSTRONG CREEK - Liz Wywialowski gets a certain feeling when she comes back to her old family farm near Armstrong Creek.

"You would see me breathing deeply," she says, drawing in a lungful of oxygen. "Even now, there's nothing like clean, fresh air."

Liz grew up on this farm, and now owns the place, though she lives in southern Wisconsin. Her father built the majestic cedar-sided barn with her brothers, finishing it in 1944.

"He built this barn as if it would be the last barn he would need to build," Liz says.

+ Read More

MADISON - The Legislature's finance committee has adopted Republican Gov. Scott Walker's plan to eliminate 80 positions within the state Department of Natural Resources, including more than half of the researchers in the agency's science bureau.

+ Read More

MINOCQUA - One Northwoods business gives people a bird's eye view. One year into the business venture, Northwoods Zip Line in Minocqua is happy with the business they are doing.

+ Read More
Merrill police donate carSubmitted: 05/29/2015

MERRILL - A Merrill public safety center can now use a new patrol car for training. The Merrill Police Department donated one of their retired police cars to the Northcentral Technical College's Public Safety Center of Excellence. The donation marks the end of Crown Victoria police cars for the city.

"We've just retired our last Ford Crown Victoria," said Merrill Police Chief Ken Neff. "A couple of years ago, Ford stopped manufacturing the Crown Victoria as a fleet vehicle. For years we've had Crown Vics, but now we've gone to the Ford Taurus and the Ford Explorer."

+ Read More

MADISON - Wisconsin lawmakers have rejected Republican Gov. Scott Walker's plan to block the state Department of Natural Resources from purchasing any land through its stewardship program for at least the next 13 years.

+ Read More

THREE LAKES - Eleven campgrounds in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest closed this year after the U.S. Forest Service reduced its funding and services.

The cuts happened because fewer people have been visiting the campgrounds in the last few years, but the Three Lakes Town Board will pay to keep one of its grounds open for the 2015 season.

+ Read More

WHITE LAKE - Students in White Lake spent the day outside of the classroom learning about invasive species today. It was the 16th annual Spring Lake Day at White Lake. It's part of the year-round Adopt-A-Lake program that teaches students about waterway and environmental preservation.

"Being on White Lake and being in the Northwoods, aquatic invasive species education is extremely important," said Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator John Preuss. "And a good way to reach out to people is through our students and through our youth."

Elementary students from White Lake School learned about the different aquatic invasive species such as purple loosestrife, and Eurasian watermilfoil. They also learned how to prevent them from spreading.

"Those plants spread by fragmentation and boat traffic," said Preuss. "And just educating people so they know the right steps to take and the laws to prevent this plant from moving around. We have 15,000 lakes in Wisconsin; just a small percentage have an invasive species."

Students also learned about the spread of a tree killing bug called emerald ash bore.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here