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NEWS STORIES

Cold temperatures present problems for homeless and stray animalsSubmitted: 01/21/2013

Hayley Tenpas
Evening Anchor/Reporter/Producer
htenpas@wjfw.com

RHINELANDER - With temperatures as frigid as they are lately, you hope everyone has a warm roof over their heads.

When stepping outside today can take your breath away that means bundling up, wearing extra layers and staying inside to stay warm.

But for many people, that can be easier said than done.

As the temperatures plummet across the Northwoods, one local business is prepared to help those who need shelter.

Frederick Place in Rhinelander is an emergency, temporary homeless shelter.

Although they don't offer one night stays, they can help out individuals looking for shelter from the cold.

"We reach out to the area churches to the police station, those kinds of places services if you're looking for just one night, because obviously it's too cold to be out there," said Tammy Modic, executive director of NATH.
Frederick Place took in 200 people within the last two years.

The shelter is open to finding a place for those looking for short term shelter.

"And it is also good to know that we are available and right now we do have beds available, because a year ago if this would've happened I would've had to turn someone away even if it was this cold," said Modic.

Staying warm in the freezing weather can also be difficult for animals.

The Oneida County Humane Society has been busy treating animals who've been exposed to the weather.

"Make sure if your dog or cat is outside, maybe bring them in to your garage, or have a house for them to go into with straw or hay that can keep them warm," said Dane County Humane Society director Bria Swartout.

The Humane Society says they've seen a lot of animals come in with frostbite on their ears and feet.

Keeping your pet's feet protected by booties or limiting their time outdoors can prevent frostbite.

In both of these situations, it's important to note that there are places to go to be warm.
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