Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Certified TeachersSubmitted: 01/09/2013
Story By Melissa Constanzer


EAGLE RIVER - You might think once your kid's teachers are hired, they're set, but at least three Northwoods educators are getting big recognition.

The Northland Pines teachers earned their National Board Certification. The process can take up to three years. Only fifty percent of applicants receive their certification. High school principal, Jim Brewer, says it is great for the school.

"The state of Wisconsin recognizes individuals who achieve National Board Certification as the highest level. It puts them at a master educator status," says Brewer.

The process is helpful for teachers in two ways. First, teachers must track students learning. Second, teachers videotape themselves in lectures. Newly certified math teacher John Hayes found the process useful.

"Especially through the video process, you watch yourself a hundred times on video and you see oh, I can be doing this better or I can be doing this better," said Hayes.

The two other teachers that received their certification are kindergarten grade teacher, Kim Lewandowski, and Middle School special education teacher, Faith Schneider. Other teachers are already preparing for next year with good reason to do so.

"What I've heard from other people that have done that is that it really improves your teaching. It really makes you study what you are doing, why your doing it, how it helps students, how you can help students learn," said Robin Indermuehle, a science teacher applying for next year.

Overall, teachers say it is the students that get the benefit of better teachers.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 12/06/2016

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:


A Lac Du Flambeau educator and activist gives us her reaction to the news that the company building the Dakota Access Pipeline says it does not plan to reroute the project in spite of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers decision not to grant an easement.

We'll tell you why forest health specialists are concerned that the deadly Oak Wilt disease in southern Wisconsin is now spreading into the Northwoods.

And we'll show you how donating a deer head will help DNR officials study Chronic Wasting Disease and give them more information for future hunting.


We'll bring you the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

+ Read More

MADISON - University of Wisconsin System officials are poised to raise out-of-state and graduate tuition again to help offset the impact of Gov. Scott Walker's resident undergraduate tuition freeze.

The Board of Regents is scheduled to vote on a plan Thursday that would raise out-of-state and graduate tuition by hundreds of dollars at six four-year campuses and all the system's two-year schools.

The largest increase would come at UW-Madison, which has proposed raising nonresident undergraduate tuition by $2,000 in each of the next two years and raising tuition for some graduate programs by as much as $5,000 annually.

The regents in 2015 approved raising nonresident and graduate tuition at eight four-year campuses and this past spring signed off on raising nonresident and graduate tuition at five schools.

+ Read More

MADISON - The Republican chairman of the Legislature's budget committee says the proposed Wisconsin Department of Transportation budget for the next two years is essential a divestment in roads.

Rep. John Nygren's comments came Tuesday during testimony from DOT Secretary Mark Gottlieb at an Assembly committee hearing. Nygren is joining with other lawmakers in questioning whether the budget put forward relying on half a billion dollars in borrowing and delaying projects is the most responsible plan.

+ Read More

MADISON - Road builders, local governments, business leaders, agricultural interests and environmentalists are all getting a chance to weigh in on how to pay for improving Wisconsin's roads.

The state Assembly's Transportation Committee scheduled an informational hearing for Tuesday on the topic.

The state Department of Transportation faces a nearly $1 billion budget shortfall, which it is proposing solving through increased borrowing and delaying work on major projects.

Republican lawmakers are split on whether raising taxes and fees should also be considered as part of the mix.

+ Read More

Play Video

LINCOLN COUNTY - Prosecutors often struggle to turn a "He said, She said" case into a trial.

But the Lincoln County District Attorney's Office thinks it has enough to send a Merrill Police and Fire Commission member to prison.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - The Crescent Fire Department spent years trying to find a good place for a town pavilion. It turns out the best spot was right in its own backyard.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Oneida County Judge Patrick O'Melia will add a new role as Deputy Chief Judge in our northern Wisconsin judicial district.

O'Melia is one of two Oneida County Circuit Court Judges.

Marathon County Judge Gregory Huber serves as Chief Judge in the Ninth Judicial Administrative District. O'Melia will become his deputy.

The judicial district includes 12 counties in northcentral Wisconsin. O'Melia will likely represent the Chief Judge in some official functions or dealings with other agencies.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 





Click Here