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NEWS STORIES

State of the Art Surgical Robot in the NorthwoodsSubmitted: 12/13/2012
Story By Michael Crusan

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WOODRUFF - Imagine a surgical procedure with faster recovery, less pain and fewer complications and risks.

Thanks to the efforts of area doctors and community members that dream is a reality in Woodruff.

Remarkable only begins to describe the da Vinci Surgical Robot.
Ministry Howard Young Hospital Director of Surgical Services Mike Gibbons says, "We were able to attain this technology in a hospital this size, which is pretty rare."

The Marshfield Clinic and Ministry Howard Young Hospital teamed up to perform some of the latest and most advanced surgeries in medicine.

Dr. John Twelmeyer with the Marshfield Clinic says, "The surgeon sits at the console and operates the arms of the da Vinci with just two fingers on each side."

At the helm of the da Vinci surgical robot the technology is something you might think that you'd find down at the Mayo Clinic or in the Cook County Hospital in Chicago.

But actually, it's found right here in the Northwoods.

That's because patients and doctors all got together because they wanted to see something they could bring into a Northwoods community here at the Howard Young Medical Center so patients could have quicker recovery times and more accurate procedures.

Gibbons says, "The people we've talked to have been incredibly amazed that they've been able to have this done here locally."

The robot can move past the limitations of the human hand with it's four robotic arms and high definition imagery.

Twelmeyer explains, "Instruments actually have more maneuverability than the human wrist does. So you can get in there and do very delicate dissections that you wouldn't otherwise be able to do with the regular laparoscopic equipment."

The da Vinci isn't able to perform every kind of operation, but the list is growing.

Gibbons says, "Currently, in addition to gynecology, we also offer urology services for operations of the prostate and kidney. As well as general surgery for colon surgery, gall bladder and things of that nature."

Twelmeyer says, even though the robot is reliable and can handle most procedures with ease, human hands are always on standby, "The whole O.R. crew is still in the room. The only difference is the surgeon isn't standing at the tableside. He or she is standing or sitting at the console."

Using the latest in medical technology and within a short drive for some of the most rural patients in the state.

The four surgeons who are trained to use the da Vinci Surgical Robot have already exceeded their operation goals in the first few months it's been up and running.

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 IN OTHER NEWS
Students get opportunity to plan for life after high schoolSubmitted: 09/17/2014

MINOCQUA - High School students need to start thinking about life after high school during their junior and senior year.

On Wednesday Lakeland Union High School and Nicolet College hosted the Wisconsin Education Fair to help them with that.

Nearly 80 colleges, universities and branches of the military offered information to high school juniors and seniors from all across northern Wisconsin.

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Apple crop a complete loss for someSubmitted: 09/17/2014

DOOR COUNTY - Some Door County apple growers will not be able to bring in a crop this year.

Two months ago hail destroyed some of the crops.

Apples are rotting on the branches at Fellner Orchards just north of Sturgeon Bay.

Grower Bob Fellner says he lost 60 acres of apples that he can't even sell for juice.

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State DOJ asks for more money to handle officer involved death investigationsSubmitted: 09/16/2014

MADISON - Police and sheriff's offices in Wisconsin must ask outside agencies to investigate officer involved deaths. The state legislature passed that law in April.

That's led to an increased caseload for the state Department of Justice.

On Tuesday, the department asked Governor Scott Walker for more than $738,000 to deal with the caseload as part of the department's budget for the next two years.

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Park Falls to move forward with industrial park dialogue; Butternut & Fifield yet to take actionSubmitted: 09/16/2014

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PRICE AND ASHLAND COUNTIES - Park Falls, Butternut and Fifield could all add industrial space to parts of their area. Park Falls Area Community Development Corporation Administrator Frank Kempf says he noticed the area needed more industrial space when he took over his position in 2006.

He describes the situation when he first came aboard.

"The north industrial park here in Park Falls was full and the west industrial park had about four acres that was available for development," Kempf said.

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Man arrested after dead cows found in WisconsinSubmitted: 09/16/2014

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The Leader-Telegram reports the man was booked into jail, released and is due in court next month.

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Paddling, sailing from Minnesota to DC to fight potential minesSubmitted: 09/16/2014

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ASHLAND - In northern Wisconsin, it's iron ore in the Penokee Hills.

In northern Minnesota, it's copper and nickel near the Boundary Waters.

Companies across the country want to mine near different areas of wilderness.

A sailboat cruising across Chequamegon Bay into Ashland might be the most visible opposition to those Minnesota sulfide mining proposals.

"Nice sail in?" we call out to the man and woman steering the boat, garnering a positive response.

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A local teen finds passion in classical musicSubmitted: 09/16/2014

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EAGLE RIVER - A local teen and two retirees will perform in a free classical variety concert Wednesday at 7pm at the Northland Pines High School Auditorium.

You do not need to know about classical music to enjoy the concert.

15-year-old Eddie Stevens loves music. He can play more than 15 instruments.

"If you gave me an instrument that I didn't know, I could probably figure it out in about 30 minutes," said Northland Pines Sophomore Eddie Stevens.

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