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NEWS STORIES

Oneida County Board Discusses Mining Rules, Wireless ServicesSubmitted: 10/16/2012

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RHINELANDER - On Monday, some Oneida County Supervisors hoped to end any future mining exploration.

They wanted to remove the current rules, making it more difficult for mining to come back before the board.

But, the full county board decided today to push the idea back to the Forestry Committee, which oversees mining, to make that call.

Any future mining projects would have to write new rules and form a new committee.

Supervisor Paul Dean put forth the resolution.

"Without the language there, that means whoever wants to start this up again will have to go through the language and startup a new committee," Dean said.

"It makes a little bit harder to have another committee or people saying we want this."

Other board members thought removing the committee would waste time in the future if the issue comes up again.

"I don't think it does any harm to anybody to leave this on the books," Supervisor Tom Rudolph said.

"Rather than in case there is some interest in mining or a referendum indicates we should resurrect this issue, we don't have to start again from scratch to draft a new ordinance."

The board voted 15 to 4 to send it back to committee.

Technology upgrades were also up for debate.

The board is looking into county wireless or internet coverage.

Dave Hintz and others mentioned the benefits of enhancing coverage across the county.

"The purpose of this committee would be to enhance internet service throughout the county and cell service throughout the county," Hintz said.

"Basically like an economic development effort to improve service in the area that was facilitated by the town of Three Lakes."

Supervisor Bob Martini thinks the expansion could help business, tourism, and residents.

"I think the more counties that undertake a coordinative role in this subject, the more this whole system will advance across the nation," Martini said.

While some support the idea, Jerry Shidell thinks wireless and information technology should be left to the private sector.

He doesn't think taxpayers should float the cost for people who live in areas without coverage.

"If you live out in the middle of the boondocks, you chose to live in the boondocks," Shidell said.

"Does that mean that, I, who chose to live in the city or others who chose to live in a more populous area have the responsibility to provide you with your coverage? I don't believe so. Especially since you can get that coverage from a satellite, if it is that important to you, put up a satellite."

The board ultimately voted to create a technology committee and explore the options.

Story By: Matt Doyle

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 IN OTHER NEWS
Summer temperatures impact local toy salesSubmitted: 07/25/2014

RHINELANDER AND MINOCQUA - Summer gets us outside playing games on the lake or in the yard, but with cooler temperatures this year, trips to the lake may not be as popular.

That impacts certain businesses in a good way. Imaginuity toys stores in Minocqua and Rhinelander have noticed a difference in the toys they've sold this summer.

"We're definitely getting a lot more traffic with the cooler temperatures. A lot more people in the door, which we're loving. We are seeing a lot more people buying more project based items. They're buying a lot of the active play but not so much the water active," said Jessica Hatch, Store Manager.

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Garden tour Saturday to raise money for hospiceSubmitted: 07/25/2014

RHINELANDER - You can learn how to improve your garden while also supporting a Northwoods hospice provider.

The Master Gardeners of the North and Ministry Hospice will host a garden tour Saturday, July 26th. People will get to tour six gardens in Rhinelander's historic courthouse neighborhood.

Organizers hope the event will raise at least $2,000. That money will go to patients who are unable to pay for their services.

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Wisconsin leads nation in producing mink peltsSubmitted: 07/25/2014

MADISON - Wisconsin leads the nation in the production of mink pelts.

Some of those pelts come from the northwoods, with mink farms in the Tomahawk and Irma areas.

The state accounted for one in three U.S. pelts last year.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says Wisconsin produced 1.13 million mink pelts last year.

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Wounded Warrior Amputee Softball Team to play in Northwoods this weekendSubmitted: 07/24/2014

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LAKE TOMAHAWK - Wounded warriors won't let their injuries stop them from playing softball this weekend.

The Wounded Warrior Amputee Softball Team will travel to Lake Tomahawk to play the Lake Tomahawk Snowhawks this weekend.

The Lake Tomahawk Snowshoe Baseball Team needed to raise $40,000 to bring the team to Lake Tomahawk.

They also had to renovate the field.

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Briefs piling up in gay marriage rulings appealsSubmitted: 07/24/2014

INDIANAPOLIS - At least 20 friend of the court briefs have been filed in appeals of rulings overturning gay marriage bans in Indiana and Wisconsin, including one by a group of churches and another by 10 states' attorneys general.

The brief filed by the attorneys general argues that society should decide whether same-sex marriage is acceptable, not the courts.

Another brief filed by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and groups representing four other churches argues that marriage between a man and a woman is God's will.

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Possible threat to potatoesSubmitted: 07/24/2014

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LANGLADE COUNTY - Farmers in Central Wisconsin need to keep a close eye on their potatoes.

Agricultural leaders from UW-Extension received a report of late blight from a farm in Portage County. Late blight is a disease that can kill potato and tomato crops.

The blight was found last week near Stevens Point, and leaders are worried about it spreading into Langlade County. Late blight can spread out several miles though the wind and the water. Agriculture experts in Langlade say there are certain things that you can do to protect your crops.

"Go out and scout them, look at them, we would like you to also spray protectants," says UW-Extension Agriculture Agent Stephanie Plaster. "Home gardeners should be spraying a copper or chlorothalonil-based spray. There are also organic copper sprays available for folks that would like to remain organic."

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New treatment for ringing in the ears Submitted: 07/24/2014

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MINOCQUA - A Northwoods doctor of Audiology offers a new treatment for ringing, buzzing and swishing in the ears, known as Tinnitus.

50 million Americans suffer from Tinnitus.

Some people aren't bothered by it, but it can be debilitating for others.

Dr. Christine Albertus of Minocqua's Marshfield Clinic uses a new technology to re-train the brain to ignore the sounds.

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