Loading

50°F

51°F

53°F

49°F

53°F

50°F

48°F

56°F

53°F
NEWS STORIES

Equine Encephalitis Hits North Central WisconsinSubmitted: 08/22/2011
MADISON - The mosquito-borne disease called Eastern equine encephalitis, or EEE, has struck two horses in two different north central Wisconsin counties, prompting a second warning from the Wisconsin State Veterinarian.

Blood samples from a 7-year-old American quarter horse in Price County and a 6-year-old Belgian mare in Taylor County were submitted to Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory Aug. 11 and Aug. 12, respectively. Both showed signs of neurological disease, and neither had been vaccinated for EEE. It is not known whether the horses survived.

"Vaccinate your horses if you haven't already, or get boosters for those you vaccinated earlier in the year," says State Veterinarian Dr. Robert Ehlenfeldt. "EEE has a mortality rate in excess of 90 percent. The vaccine is not expensive, it's effective, and if we've found EEE in these three counties, it's reasonable to assume it's more widespread. Unless we have a really early killing frost, we still have a lot of mosquito season ahead of us."

Ehlenfeldt issued his first warning Aug. 9, after his office received notification that two llamas in Dunn County had died from EEE, and a horse on the same farm had been sickened.

Rarely, humans may also contract EEE, but no human cases have appeared in Wisconsin.

In addition to vaccination, Ehlenfeldt advised owners can take steps to reduce their animals' exposure to mosquitoes. They should eliminate standing water by removing objects like old tires or even the folds in tarps where water collects, and frequently changing water in water troughs, bird baths and similar containers. If possible, owners should also keep their animals inside barns if possible from dusk through dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.

EEE is caused by a virus that may be transmitted by mosquito bite to horses, birds, and humans. The virus is not transmitted between animals or between animals and humans. Vaccines are available that protect against other strains of equine encephalitis along with EEE, and a separate West Nile virus vaccine is also available. WNV is also mosquito-borne.

Symptoms in horses include depression, loss of appetite, drooping eyelids and lower lip, aimless wandering and circling, blindness and sometimes paralysis. There is no cure; the disease must run its course. Most animals die or must be euthanized, but a few recover.

Wisconsin experienced a major outbreak of EEE in 2001, with 69 confirmed or presumptive positive cases, mostly in northwestern Wisconsin. Since then, sporadic cases have occurred. Because EEE follows mosquito populations, it normally occurs beginning in mid- to late summer and remains a threat until the first killing frost.

Story By: WJFW News Team

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
 Print Story Print Story | Email Story Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS
Merrill's downtown mural by student artists evokes history, cultureSubmitted: 07/28/2014

Play Video

MERRILL - "We normally do murals inside the high school by famous artists, and we do a re-creation of their work," says Merrill high school junior McKenzie Broeking.

But Broeking is painting with six other juniors, not only outside of the high school, but completely outdoors.

"They've run out of room in the high school for these murals. They have many of them now in the school. They decided to move their talents outside," says Art Lersch, a Community Resource Development Educator with the Lincoln County UW-Extension.

+ Read More
80-year-old dies after getting hit by trainSubmitted: 07/28/2014

Play Video

WISCONSIN RAPIDS - An 80-year-old woman died Sunday in Wisconsin Rapids after getting hit by a train.

Police say Joyce Huber, 80, died at the scene.

Huber tried to cross the tracks and was hit by a Canadian National Railway train that was going south.

Police say the railroad crossing safety arms and lights were working.

They also say the train's horn was working.

+ Read More
Child runover by van on driveway, dies at hospitalSubmitted: 07/28/2014

Play Video

RACINE - A 5-year-old girl has died after being struck by a van in the driveway of a Racine home.

Police say the child had just arrived for a party in the neighborhood Saturday afternoon and was facing the street when a 16-year-old boy backed a van over the girl.

Authorities say a rear wheel ran over the girl. The teen heard people yelling and shouting, but didn't know he had hit someone. So, he pulled the van forward, running over the girl a second time.

+ Read More
Wisconsin man gets 9.5 years for drunk drivingSubmitted: 07/28/2014

MILWAUKEE - A Wisconsin man has been sentenced to nearly 10 years in prison for leading police on a drunken driving chase that ended in a near-fatal crash.

The Journal Sentinel reports (http://bit.ly/1nSZKzi ) 41-year-old Kevin Hutchins Jr. of Milwaukee reached speeds of 100 mph during a seven-mile police chase. Deputy Scott Griffin was critically injured when Hutchins' vehicle bounced off of a barricade and smashed into his squad car.

+ Read More
UPDATE: Missing man found dead in car underwaterSubmitted: 07/28/2014

Play Video

IRONWOOD, MI - Police found a missing Hurley man in his car underwater in Ironwood, Sunday.

74-year-old Duane Jussila's car was found underwater under about 10 feet of water in an area off of Alfred Wright Boulevard.

Jussila was reported missing July 5th. The man was suffering from dementia.

Police are still investigating.


+ Read More
Study: fist bumps spread 90% fewer germs than handshakesSubmitted: 07/28/2014

Play Video

NATIONWIDE - You could spread fewer germs by going with the fist bump instead of a handshake.

A new study from Aberystwyth University in Wales shows a fist bump spreads 90 percent fewer germs compared to a handshake. That could be the difference between staying healthy and getting sick.

"That portion of our hands is subjected to every surface area, desktops, and countertops as well," said Oneida County Public Health Nurse Charlotte Ahrens. "We probably have a gazillion germs that are hitting that surface at any given point in time."

Researchers say the fist bump may be more hygienic because of its speed and smaller surface area. Health leaders like Ahrens say the transfer of some germs can actually help us.

+ Read More
Speeding past orange barrels could bring $300 fineSubmitted: 07/28/2014

MINNESOTA - Getting caught speeding through a road construction work zone is about to get more costly in Minnesota.

Starting Friday, the offense comes with an automatic $300 fine plus the normal traffic ticket surcharges. That's under a new state law approved during the legislative session.

Officials from the Department of Transportation, a highway contractor and the State Patrol planned a news conference Monday to highlight the change. They hope the steeper penalty will serve as a deterrent.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here