Loading

53°F

54°F

53°F

51°F

53°F

51°F

53°F

55°F

53°F
NEWS STORIES

Equine Encephalitis Hits North Central WisconsinSubmitted: 08/22/2011
Story By WJFW News Team

MADISON - The mosquito-borne disease called Eastern equine encephalitis, or EEE, has struck two horses in two different north central Wisconsin counties, prompting a second warning from the Wisconsin State Veterinarian.

Blood samples from a 7-year-old American quarter horse in Price County and a 6-year-old Belgian mare in Taylor County were submitted to Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory Aug. 11 and Aug. 12, respectively. Both showed signs of neurological disease, and neither had been vaccinated for EEE. It is not known whether the horses survived.

"Vaccinate your horses if you haven't already, or get boosters for those you vaccinated earlier in the year," says State Veterinarian Dr. Robert Ehlenfeldt. "EEE has a mortality rate in excess of 90 percent. The vaccine is not expensive, it's effective, and if we've found EEE in these three counties, it's reasonable to assume it's more widespread. Unless we have a really early killing frost, we still have a lot of mosquito season ahead of us."

Ehlenfeldt issued his first warning Aug. 9, after his office received notification that two llamas in Dunn County had died from EEE, and a horse on the same farm had been sickened.

Rarely, humans may also contract EEE, but no human cases have appeared in Wisconsin.

In addition to vaccination, Ehlenfeldt advised owners can take steps to reduce their animals' exposure to mosquitoes. They should eliminate standing water by removing objects like old tires or even the folds in tarps where water collects, and frequently changing water in water troughs, bird baths and similar containers. If possible, owners should also keep their animals inside barns if possible from dusk through dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.

EEE is caused by a virus that may be transmitted by mosquito bite to horses, birds, and humans. The virus is not transmitted between animals or between animals and humans. Vaccines are available that protect against other strains of equine encephalitis along with EEE, and a separate West Nile virus vaccine is also available. WNV is also mosquito-borne.

Symptoms in horses include depression, loss of appetite, drooping eyelids and lower lip, aimless wandering and circling, blindness and sometimes paralysis. There is no cure; the disease must run its course. Most animals die or must be euthanized, but a few recover.

Wisconsin experienced a major outbreak of EEE in 2001, with 69 confirmed or presumptive positive cases, mostly in northwestern Wisconsin. Since then, sporadic cases have occurred. Because EEE follows mosquito populations, it normally occurs beginning in mid- to late summer and remains a threat until the first killing frost.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS
Hulsey launches write-in candidacy for governorSubmitted: 10/24/2014

MADISON - Just 12 days before the election, state Representative Brett Hulsey says he is running for governor as an independent write-in candidate.

Hulsey lost the Democratic primary to Mary Burke, earning 16 percent of the vote.

Hulsey announced Thursday that he was mounting a last-minute write-in campaign, but if it appears the effort is helping Republican Governor Scott Walker, he will stop.

+ Read More
Apple Crunch promotes healthy eatingSubmitted: 10/24/2014

Play Video

EAGLE RIVER - Students across the region crunched into apples at the same time Friday.

It was in celebration of Food Day.

Food Day raises awareness of where food comes from and eating healthy.

Click "Play Video" to see why serving something as simple as apples is leaving a lasting impact on young kids.

+ Read More
Vilas Food Pantry needs helpSubmitted: 10/24/2014

EAGLE RIVER - A Northwoods food pantry could struggle to put food on their shelves this fall. Vilas Food Pantry volunteers need more donations and money to feed people in need, this includes more than 250 local families. This is the first time they've needed to ask the public for help in more than ten years.

"People get laid-off and they have needs," said Vilas Food Pantry Director Richard Short. "That's what we're here for, we want to make sure everyone knows that if they have a need, you're welcome to come."

+ Read More
DNR thinks registering deer online and by phone easier for huntersSubmitted: 10/24/2014

Play Video

WISCONSIN - The DNR will make changes to how people register deer. This year they're starting a program allowing hunters to register deer online or by phone.

Only some hunters will take part in the program. Next year it will be in full effect.

"Right now we're doing a pilot program in 2014, where there's 14,000 people who've been picked to practice this registration. And next year everybody will be able to either register by phone or on the internet. They will still have the opportunity to register at a station as long as there is a telephone or a computer for them," says DNR Conservation Warden Paul Hartrick.

+ Read More
Nearly a century later, Goodman's Draxler honored with Purple HeartSubmitted: 10/24/2014

Play Video

GOODMAN - John Draxler deserves the respect and honor from the people of his hometown of Goodman, and all of northern Wisconsin.

He's always had it.

But on Friday, 96 years after his combat injuries during World War I, and 40 years after his death, it became tangible.

Draxler's family was presented with a Purple Heart.

+ Read More
Kids with disabilities tour local businesses, practice networking skillsSubmitted: 10/24/2014

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Kids with disabilities can sometimes have a difficult time finding a job.

Special education teachers at Rhinelander High School want to change that. They set up the "Amazing Race To Employment" for their students.

Students with disabilities went to different local businesses today. The race gave them a chance to ask managers questions about working at the business.

+ Read More
Educating the Northwoods about human trafficking Submitted: 10/24/2014

Play Video

WOODRUFF - Human trafficking makes an estimated 32 billion dollars every year. It's the third largest criminal industry in the world and Wisconsin is right in the center of it.

Human trafficking is a modern-day form of slavery.

The two biggest types of trafficking are sex trafficking and labor trafficking.

Sister Celine Goessl has been researching Wisconsin's human trafficking problem for a few years.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here