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Warmer temperatures affect snowmobile trails and local businessesSubmitted: 02/19/2017

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EAGLE RIVER - These unseasonably warm temps can make it hard for snowmobilers to enjoy the trails. The Wisconsin Snow Report says snowmobile trails in Eagle River are overall in poor condition.

On many of the trails, you'll see more gravel and dirt than actual snow.

"You don't know if the season comes to an end at this point because you never know when Mother Nature will throw a twist at things and give you a 20 inch snowstorm because that can happen. You know, the big lake is still open up north and if the winds come down that way, we could see a lot of Lake Affect snow yet," said Eagle River Sno Eagles Trail Boss Brian Scheid.


Scheid says Vilas County is unique because it has the option of closing the entire trail system down as a whole. All 11 snowmobile clubs make that call together. Scheid also says they may be making that decision this week.

He also encourages snowmobilers to be careful out on the trails if they do decide to go out in these conditions.

"Be careful and know where they're going. Try to find out where the best snow conditions are. Probably stick to the more of the north and west of the counties, of Vilas County for sure. It can change in a moment's notice where you may get somewhere one morning and not be able to get back in the afternoon," said Scheid.

But lack of snow and warmer weather affects more than just snowmobilers here in the Northwoods.

Businesses in Eagle River also have to adjust to the unseasonably high temperatures. On Saturday, Trackside Manager Greg Cook had to cancel his snowmobile rentals.

"Snowmobiles need to have snow to ride on. We need to have good conditions and we've got some good snow in the wood trails. It's connecting the dots that get difficult. Coming through town, the road trails, those areas have gotten almost impassable," said Cook.

Cook says each day is different. If snowy conditions come back soon, they'll start renting snowmobiles again.
Cook also says a lot of other businesses in the area are being affected by the lack of snow.

"Eagle River before snowmobiles was really not much of anything in the winter at all. So, for us up here, we thrive on snow and snowmobilers. We don't have much going on right now until the ATVs, the boats, and all that stuff starts taking place up here," said Cook.

For more information on trail conditions around the state click on the link below.


Related Weblinks:
Wisconsin Snow Reports

Story By: Allie Herrera

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