Loading
Search
TOP STORY

FDA sets new regulations for e-cigarette productsSubmitted: 05/05/2016
ONEIDA COUNTY - Before Thursday, e-cigarette companies didn't need to follow any federal regulations. But now, the Food and Drug Administration will regulate e-cigarettes, cigars, and hookahs.

That means people under 18 will no longer be able to buy those products.

Local health experts say that's a good thing because there's been a big rise in the number of teens using e-cigarettes and they worry the kids don't fully understand what's inside of the product.

"I don't think that they know the dangers behind them and some of them don't even know that they're using a nicotine product," says community health specialist Corie Zelazoski. "We've done a lot of outreach at the schools and we've had kids come up to us and say 'I'm not smoking tobacco -I'm just vaping and it's fruit so it's safe."

Companies who make e-cigarettes will also need to label exactly what's inside of their products.

Health experts say that'll make it easier to see if addictive ingredients are being used.

"It also requires them to put labels on their products saying if they're containing nicotine, there is an addiction possibility," says Zelazoski.

Health experts still worry online purchases aren't being regulated strictly.

Story By: Karolina Buczek

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
 Print Story Print Story | Email Story Email Story










 LOCAL NEWS

RHINELANDER - The Rhinelander Food Pantry recently received a generous donation from the Northwood Turners.

" The food pantry has just been a great boom to this area and it was needed for such a long time and now they are doing really great," says Northwood Carvers President Bill Kingsbury.

This group of 50 or so wood turners used their talents to create wooden bowls that were used as part of a fundraising event for the pantry.

"Our club made a total of 110 bowls," explaines Kingsbury.

This isn't the first time the club has stepped up.

The club also designed and turned pins for the Honor Flight.

Turning wood is an art form and starts by selecting the right tree.

Kingsbury says that he likes to turn them when they are green or fresh cut. When they dry out it is sometimes like cutting concrete.

There are a few rules to follow and decisions to make like deciding if you want the bark on or off.
"If you want the bark on the normal rule is if the tree is cut when the sap is not flowing the bark will stay on," says Kingsbury.

+ Read More

RHINELANDER - At a young age many of us dreamed about becoming pro athletes, rock stars, or to act. But, earlier today, kids in Rhinelander got to check out some other careers and the vehicles they use.

+ Read More
Food trucks roam the NorthwoodsSubmitted: 05/05/2016

NORTHWOODS - When you go out to eat, you usually think of typical brick and mortar restaurants, but a few local businesses might be turning the tide right here in the Northwoods just by working out of a truck.

"It's actually a growing community," says Chumpot Ratanawong, owner and operator of the Hanuman Express food truck. "It's nice because we talk to each other, we bounce ideas off each other."

You might see them on street corners or in other business's parking lots.

But one thing's for sure: you're going to get a delicious, made-from-scratch meal from passionate people like Ratanawong.

"I was in Chicago," says Ratanawong. "I was working an advertising job, and I just kind of got sick of that world. I've always loved cooking, so even when I was working that other job, I was always cooking and having Sunday dinners and that kind of thing, so I kind of just translated that into my food truck, because that's what I really love to do."

There aren't many places to get Thai food in northcentral Wisconsin, which makes the Hanuman Express that much more unique.

"I've always grown up with Thai food," says Ratanawong. "I've learned a lot from my mother, because she's a great cook. I've also kind of experimented on my own as well."

Those experiments turn into some of the best foods on the menu, and that's good, considering the lines can run as long as the truck itself.

"The main thing is just being prepared for it," says Ratanawong. "Sometimes we over-prepare, sometimes we under-prepare, depending on whatever. But we like to be ready for the crowds that come, and the better prepared we are, the better we're able to handle the long lines."

Though the work might be tougher, being in a food truck makes it well worth it.

"It's easier in the fact that there's less overhead," says Ratanawong. "You don't have to pay as much staff, I guess. So the costs of actually running it are better. Plus the advantage is that, they always talk about location being key. Well, if you're in a food truck, if you're in a bad spot, then you just move. It's as easy as that."

One food truck that seems to have found their perfect spot is Lola's Lunchbox in Phillips.

Settled into the parking lot of the R-Store gas station, they're now a staple in the small town.

"We started four years ago actually, with seven items on our menu, and three of them were dessert," says Lola's Co-Owner Mitch Adams. "It just kind of grew from there. We found a niche. We decided that we were going to cook the food that we liked."

Mitch and Stephanie Adams moved back to Phillips to be closer to family.

Steph had always been a great cook, and the two decided to give the business a shot.

"We kind of knew it was a coming trend," says Adams. "We didn't know how it was going to work in a small town, but we jumped in, and we've been able to make it work."

Lola's got started with what they call 'stacker' meat " a combination of pulled beef and pork, but it's their signature garlic smashies that bring the people in droves.

"I don't even really know how that started," says Adams. "We don't deep fry anything in here, just because it's so small and tight, but people kept asking for sides, so [Steph] did the potatoes. She said 'I think I can do this. I'll just smash them on the grill.' She hard-boils them, smashes them on the grill, and bastes them in garlic butter. We started serving those, and then pretty soon, 'Hey I want those potato things,' you know."

Don't think for one second that just because these food trucks are in northern Wisconsin that they're not open year round, because they are. As it turns out, they might actually be more popular during the winter time.

"We set up a couple of days during the winter, the first big snowstorm we set up," says Adams. "We set up before it was snowing, it started snowing like crazy. I was ready to go home, [Steph] said 'just wait.' And that was our busiest day to date with all the people, the Northwoods people coming out in the snow. They didn't care. I had a line out front, just making food."

It just proves that people anywhere will turn out to get a great meal close to home.

+ Read More
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 05/05/2016

- People gathered all across the nation to offer prayers for a number of different causes, including a few dozen in Rhinelander. We'll share their message and hope for prayer in the open tonight at 5, 6 and 10.

Plus, we will tell you about new federal rules now in place that regulate e-cigarettes.

We'll have the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

+ Read More

MARATHON COUNTY - According to the Wisconsin Department of Justice, police are looking for an 80-year-old man who they believe is endangered.

Leng Lor is described as an Asian man, who is 4'10" and 116 lbs. He also has brown eyes and black hair.

+ Read More

Play Video

PRESQUE ISLE - We told you last year about a possible water bottling plant in Minocqua, that didn't end up happening. 

Instead, project leaders tried to open the bottling facility in Presque Isle, but that might not happen either.

The Presque Isle Zoning Committee voted Wednesday against changing zoning rules for the plant.

+ Read More

Play Video

ANTIGO - For the last week and a half many people shared stories of shock, sadness, fear and hope out of Antigo.

Police, students and clergy all spoke out, struggling to figure out why the prom night shooting happened.

For the first time on Wednesday, one shooting victim told his story.

Collin Cooper, 18, said he's doing ok. He spent nearly seven days in the hospital, undergoing three surgeries to get the leg just below the knee on the right track to heal properly. He wraps an ace bandage around his left calf, which covers the wound. He also has stitches from where doctors made incisions during surgery. He also has a vacuum-assisted closure, or V.A.C., for the wound.

"I can't walk yet," Cooper said. "But they said I can put pressure on it in about three to four weeks, I think they said. But I wont be back to walking on it fully for three to four months."
He said doctors told him the bullet shattered 10 percent of his tibia, a major bone in the calf.

"They said the lucky part is it didn't hit any major arteries and it only nicked one vein," Cooper added.

Now Cooper has to sit at home and rest up. His blood levels are still low, and it hurts to hold his leg vertically. Several times a day he has to do ankle and knee exercises to strengthen the muscles around them. Otherwise he has to keep his leg elevated, even while he sleeps, which is in a hospital bed the family already had. He said it's hard sometimes to take it so easy because he's been on several sports teams throughout high school and is used to being very active.

He says when family and friends aren't visiting him at home, he plays video games and watches TV. He can't yet return to school, so he his doing some work from home.

But when you ask Cooper about how he's processing the shooting at prom, he just shrugs.

"I'm kind of bummed to be down right now but I'm thankful and lucky that it was just this and it could have been a lot worse," Cooper said.

He's been bombarded on social media, flooded with questions and friend requests. He's only posted several times since the shooting, with the #AntigoStrong hashtag that's been trending on social media since the prom.

The oldest of five has leaned on his faith, his family and his friends.

"I'm fine I just want people to worry about Collin," said Cooper's friend Spencer Fittante, 17, who was walking out of prom with Cooper when he was shot. Fittante helped tie a his tie around Cooper's leg as a tourniquet.

"I never thought anything like that would ever happen to us, ever," Fittante said.

Still, Cooper won't let the injury keep him from working this summer or walking across the stage at graduation. He joked about practicing walking up stairs with his crutches. He said he thinks his humor helps him cope.

He's proud of and humbled by the Antigo community. He said there are days when it gets hard, but he's got the support of his family and friends. He wants to move on, but he also thinks sharing his experience might be able to help others.

"It's cool to see how the town has rallied around me and the all the other victims," Cooper said. "I think it's kind of a cool opportunity to have to share with people what happened. And I can kind of help them through things too. So I mean I want to put some of it in the past but some of it I want to hold onto so I can be able to help people in the future."

Cooper said his date who was grazed by a bullet is also doing well. He said she is back at school in Illinois. Cooper still plans to work this summer and attend college in the fall. 

+ Read More
+ More Local News
Search: 







Click Here